MicroMod mikroBUS™ Carrier Board Hookup Guide

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Contributors: santaimpersonator, MAKIN-STUFF
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Introduction

Advanced Product: Novice users, may find the amount information contained in this tutorial somewhat daunting. This board is relatively complex and involves compatibility with three separate ecosystems and can be utilize two different development environments.

Introducing the our most versatile development board, the MicroMod mikroBUS™ Carrier Board! This new board takes advantage of the MicroMod, Qwiic, and the mikroBUS™ ecosystems and allows users to take advantage of the growing number of 7 MicroMod processor boards, 83 Qwiic (add-on) boards, and 1079 available Click boards™ (as of September 2021), which equates to +51M different board combinations.

SparkFun MicroMod mikroBUS Carrier Board

SparkFun MicroMod mikroBUS Carrier Board

DEV-18710
$19.95

The mikroBUS™ standard was developed by MikroElektronika. Similar to our Qwiic and MicroMod interfaces, mikroBUS™ provides a standardized connection for add-on Click boards™ to be hooked up to a microcontroller based development board.

Image source: https://www.mikroe.com/1000-click-boards

For more details, check out their blog post on the 1000th Click board™ and the origins of the mikroBUS™ standard and mikroBUS™ standard specifications.

Required Materials

To get started, users will need a few of items listed below. (You may already have a some of these items; read through the guide and modify your cart accordingly.)

MicroMod Processor Board

Like other MicroMod Carrier Boards, a Processor Board is required for the product to operate. Users will need a Processor Board (of their choice) to attach to the MicroMod M.2 connector; since, one is not included with this product. Below, are few options; however, we recommend the STM32 processor board. Currently, it is the only processor board supported by Necto Studio and the Arduino IDE.

SparkFun MicroMod STM32 Processor

SparkFun MicroMod STM32 Processor

DEV-17713
$16.50
SparkFun MicroMod Teensy Processor

SparkFun MicroMod Teensy Processor

DEV-16402
$21.50
4
SparkFun MicroMod ESP32 Processor

SparkFun MicroMod ESP32 Processor

WRL-16781
$16.95
1
SparkFun MicroMod SAMD51 Processor

SparkFun MicroMod SAMD51 Processor

DEV-16791
$18.95
1
SparkFun MicroMod RP2040 Processor

SparkFun MicroMod RP2040 Processor

DEV-17720
$12.95

Required Hardware

A Phillips screw driver is necessary to attach the Processor board to the Carrier Board.

SparkFun MicroMod mikroBUS Carrier Board

SparkFun MicroMod mikroBUS Carrier Board

DEV-18710
$19.95
MicroMod Screwdriver

MicroMod Screwdriver

TOL-19012
$0.50
JTAG Programming

To program the STM32 processor board (recommended) through Necto Studio (preferred), users will need a JTAG programmer. Below are programmers that are compatible with the Necto Studio software.

Apple Mac/Linux: Users with a Mac or Linux OS, should purchase the CODEGRIP programmer. The mikroProg is only compatible with Windows PCs.
MIKROE mikroProg for STM32

MIKROE mikroProg for STM32

PGM-19104
$69.95
MIKROE CODEGRIP for STM32

MIKROE CODEGRIP for STM32

PGM-19105
$129.95

Users will also need some soldering equipment and a JTAG header to connect the programmer to the board. Additionally, with the (recommended) programmers, an adapter is needed to convert the .1" (100 mil) header spacing of the programmer's cable to the .05" (50 mil) header spacing of the JTAG pins on the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board.

Note: Users should verify that the pinout for the programmer and adapter match up to the corresponding pins of the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board to avoid damaging the MCU.
Solder Lead Free - 100-gram Spool

Solder Lead Free - 100-gram Spool

TOL-09325
$9.95
7
Weller WLC100 Soldering Station

Weller WLC100 Soldering Station

TOL-14228
$67.95
2
Chip Quik No-Clean Flux Pen  - 10mL

Chip Quik No-Clean Flux Pen - 10mL

TOL-14579
$8.95
4
Header - 2x5 Pin (Male, 1.27mm)

Header - 2x5 Pin (Male, 1.27mm)

PRT-15362
$1.75
Header - 2x5 Pin (Female, 1.27mm)

Header - 2x5 Pin (Female, 1.27mm)

PRT-15363
$1.75
MIKROE 50-100mil Adapter

MIKROE 50-100mil Adapter

PGM-19220
$14.95
USB Programming

To program a MicroMod processor through the Arduino IDE (not the preferred method), a USB-C cable is needed to connect the Carrier Board to a computer.

USB 3.1 Cable A to C - 3 Foot

USB 3.1 Cable A to C - 3 Foot

CAB-14743
$5.50
4
Click Board™

We recommend purchasing a Click board™ to utilize the mikroBUS™ socket. Feel free to choose from any of the available Click boards™ in our catalog. Below are a few options.

Note: If users intend to use the Arduino IDE, we recommend that novice users select a Click board™ that is supported with an Arduino library. Otherwise, users will have difficulties programming their board to utilize the associated Click board™.
MIKROE 10x10 RGB Click

MIKROE 10x10 RGB Click

COM-18922
$41.95
MIKROE Balancer 2 Click

MIKROE Balancer 2 Click

PRT-19481
$20.95
MIKROE Secure 5 Click

MIKROE Secure 5 Click

DEV-19609
$12.95
MIKROE Ambient 5 Click

MIKROE Ambient 5 Click

SEN-19864
$10.95

Note: If users intend to use Click board™, with code that requires a serial data output, there are no serial pins broken out on the board besides the mikroBUS™ socket. Therefore, it is recommended that users also purchase the MIKROE Terminal Click, a 3.3V serial-to-UART adapter, jumper wires, and corresponding USB cable to access the serial data pins from the mikroBUS™ socket. Below, are a few options from our catalog:


SparkFun FTDI Basic Breakout - 3.3V

SparkFun FTDI Basic Breakout - 3.3V

DEV-09873
$16.95
66
SparkFun Serial Basic Breakout - CH340G

SparkFun Serial Basic Breakout - CH340G

DEV-14050
$8.95
6
SparkFun Serial Basic Breakout - CH340C and USB-C

SparkFun Serial Basic Breakout - CH340C and USB-C

DEV-15096
$9.95
7
MIKROE Terminal Click

MIKROE Terminal Click

DEV-18961
$6.95
Jumper Wires Premium 6" M/F Pack of 10

Jumper Wires Premium 6" M/F Pack of 10

PRT-09140
$4.50
1
USB Mini-B Cable - 6"

USB Mini-B Cable - 6"

CAB-13243
$2.10
4
USB Micro-B Cable - 6"

USB Micro-B Cable - 6"

CAB-13244
$2.10
3
USB 3.1 Cable A to C - 3 Foot

USB 3.1 Cable A to C - 3 Foot

CAB-14743
$5.50
4

Optional Hardware

To connect Qwiic breakout boards for your MicroMod project, Qwiic cables are required.

Note: If users intend to use Necto Studio, we recommend that novice users select Qwiic products that are supported with a MIKROE library. Otherwise, users will have difficulties programming their board to utilize the associated Qwiic board.

SparkFun Micro OLED Breakout (Qwiic)

SparkFun Micro OLED Breakout (Qwiic)

LCD-14532
$18.50
6
SparkFun GPS Breakout - NEO-M9N, U.FL (Qwiic)

SparkFun GPS Breakout - NEO-M9N, U.FL (Qwiic)

GPS-15712
$69.95
2
SparkFun Environmental Sensor Breakout - BME680 (Qwiic)

SparkFun Environmental Sensor Breakout - BME680 (Qwiic)

SEN-16466
$22.50
3
SparkFun Qwiic Mini ToF Imager - VL53L5CX

SparkFun Qwiic Mini ToF Imager - VL53L5CX

SEN-19013
$25.50
Qwiic Cable - 200mm

Qwiic Cable - 200mm

PRT-14428
$1.50
Qwiic Cable - 500mm

Qwiic Cable - 500mm

PRT-14429
$1.95
1
Flexible Qwiic Cable - 200mm

Flexible Qwiic Cable - 200mm

PRT-17258
$1.60
Flexible Qwiic Cable - Female Jumper (4-pin)

Flexible Qwiic Cable - Female Jumper (4-pin)

CAB-17261
$1.60

A single-cell Lithium-ion battery can be connected to the Qwiic Carrier Board for portability.

Lithium Ion Battery - 1Ah

Lithium Ion Battery - 1Ah

PRT-13813
$10.95
8
Lithium Ion Battery - 400mAh

Lithium Ion Battery - 400mAh

PRT-13851
$5.50
10
Lithium Ion Battery - 110mAh

Lithium Ion Battery - 110mAh

PRT-13853
$5.50
3
Lithium Ion Battery - 2Ah

Lithium Ion Battery - 2Ah

PRT-13855
$13.95
8

To modify the jumpers, users will need soldering equipment and/or a knife.

Hobby Knife

Hobby Knife

TOL-09200
$3.50
2

Suggested Reading

The MicroMod ecosystem is a unique way to allow users to customize their project to their needs. The Qwiic connect system is a simple method for interfacing with I2C devices. The mikroBUS™ socket is a standardized interface for the MIKROE Click boards™. Click on the banners below for more information on each ecosystem.

MicroMod Logo

Qwiic Logo

mikroBUS Logo


For users who aren't familiar with the following concepts, we also recommend reading the following tutorials before continuing.

How to Solder: Through-Hole Soldering

This tutorial covers everything you need to know about through-hole soldering.

Serial Communication

Asynchronous serial communication concepts: packets, signal levels, baud rates, UARTs and more!

Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI)

SPI is commonly used to connect microcontrollers to peripherals such as sensors, shift registers, and SD cards.

Pulse Width Modulation

An introduction to the concept of Pulse Width Modulation.

Logic Levels

Learn the difference between 3.3V and 5V devices and logic levels.

I2C

An introduction to I2C, one of the main embedded communications protocols in use today.

Analog vs. Digital

This tutorial covers the concept of analog and digital signals, as they relate to electronics.

Processor Interrupts with Arduino

What is an interrupt? In a nutshell, there is a method by which a processor can execute its normal program while continuously monitoring for some kind of event, or interrupt. There are two types of interrupts: hardware and software interrupts. For the purposes of this tutorial, we will focus on hardware interrupts.

Getting Started with MicroMod

Dive into the world of MicroMod - a compact interface to connect a microcontroller to various peripherals via the M.2 Connector!

Designing with MicroMod

This tutorial will walk you through the specs of the MicroMod processor and carrier board as well as the basics of incorporating the MicroMod form factor into your own PCB designs!

MicroMod STM32 Processor Hookup Guide

Get started with the MicroMod Ecosystem and the STM32 Processor Board!

Getting Started with Necto Studio

Necto Studio is a user friendly development environment for users looking to get started with MikroElektronika's MIKROE products.

Installing an Arduino Library

How do I install a custom Arduino library? It's easy! This tutorial will go over how to install an Arduino library using the Arduino Library Manager. For libraries not linked with the Arduino IDE, we will also go over manually installing an Arduino library.

Installing Arduino IDE

A step-by-step guide to installing and testing the Arduino software on Windows, Mac, and Linux.

ARM Programming

How to program SAMD21 or SAMD51 boards (or other ARM processors).

Installing Board Definitions in the Arduino IDE

How do I install a custom Arduino board/core? It's easy! This tutorial will go over how to install an Arduino board definition using the Arduino Board Manager. We will also go over manually installing third-party cores, such as the board definitions required for many of the SparkFun development boards.

Hardware Overview

Board Dimensions

The MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board dimensions are approximately 3.35" x 1.40" with four mounting holes compatible with 4-40 screws or standoffs.

MicroMod mikroBUS carrier board dimensions
Dimensions of the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

The board also includes a mikroBUS™ socket for MikroElektronika's Click boards™.

Photo highlighting
mikroBUS™ socket to attach Click boards™. (Click to enlarge)

Common Components

Most SparkFun MicroMod Carrier Boards will have some common components and all MicroMod Carrier Boards will have the keyed M.2 MicroMod connector for a Processor board. The photo and list below outline the common components between the mikroBUS™ carrier board and other MicroMod Carrier Boards.

  • M.2 MicroMod Connector - This special keyed M.2 connector lets you install your MicroMod Processor of choice to the mikroBUS Carrier Board.
  • USB-C Connector - Connect to your computer to program your processor and provide power to the board.
  • 3.3V Regulator - Provides a regulated 3.3V and sources up to 1A.
  • Qwiic Connectors - The standard Qwiic connectors to connect other Qwiic devices for your MicroMod project.
  • Boot/Reset Buttons - Push buttons to enter boot mode on processors and to reset your MicroMod circuit.

Annotated photo for common components on the carrier board
Common MicroMod components featured on the MicroMod mikroBUS™ Carrier Board. (Click to enlarge)

Battery Charger

The board also has a MCP73831 Single-Cell Lithium-Ion/Lithium-Polymer Charge IC so you can charge an attached single-cell LiPo battery. The charge IC receives power from the USB connection and can source up to 450mA to charge an attached battery.

Photo highlighting the charging circuit
Batery charger for the mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

Status LEDs

The carrier board has two status LEDs:

  • 3V3 - This LED indicates when 3.3V power is available top the board.
  • CHG - This LED indicates the status of the charging circuit operation.

Photo highlighting the status LEDs
Status LEDs on the mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

Solder Jumpers

Users who have never worked with soldering jumpers and cutting PCB traces before (or for a quick refresher), check out our How to Work with Solder Jumpers and PCB Traces tutorial for detailed instructions and tips.

There are four adjustable solder jumpers on the mikroBUS™ carrier board labeled MEAS, BYP, 3.3V_VE and 3.3V. The table below briefly outlines their functionalities:

Jumper Name/Label Description Default State
Measure/MEAS Open this jumper to probe the current draw at the 3.3V output of the regulator. For help measuring current, take a look at our How to Use a Multimeter tutorial. CLOSED
Bypass/BYP The "penny-in-the-fuse" jumper. Bypasses the 6V/2A fuse and nets VIN and V_USB together. Close only if you know what you are doing! OPEN
Voltage Regulator Enable/VE Voltage regulator control. Close this jumper to control the VREG in low-power applications. OPEN
3.3V LED Power/3V3 LED Connects the 3.3V LED to 3.3V via a 1K Ohm resistor. Open to disable the LED. CLOSED

Jumpers
Jumpers on the mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

MicroMod Pinout

Since this carrier board is designed to work with all of the MicroMod Processors we've included the table below to outline which pins are used so, if you would like, you can compare them to the pinout tables in their respective Hookup Guides.

AUDIO UART GPIO/BUS I2C SDIO SPI Dedicated
Function Bottom
Pin
   Top   
Pin
Function
(Not Connected) 75 GND
3.3V 74 73 G5 / BUS5
RTC_3V_BATT 72 71 G6 / BUS6
SPI_CS1# SDIO_DATA3 (I/O) 70 69 G7 / BUS7
SDIO_DATA2 (I/O) 68 67 G8
SDIO_DATA1 (I/O) 66 65 G9 ADC_D- CAM_HSYNC
SPI_CIPO1 SDIO_DATA0 (I/O) 64 63 G10 ADC_D+ CAM_VSYNC
SPI COPI1 SDIO_CMD (I/O) 62 61 SPI_CIPO (I)
SPI SCK1 SDIO_SCK (O) 60 59 SPI_COPI (O) LED_DAT
AUD_MCLK (O) 58 57 SPI_SCK (O) LED_CLK
CAM_MCLK PCM_OUT I2S_OUT AUD_OUT 56 55 SPI_CS#
CAM_PCLK PCM_IN I2S_IN AUD_IN 54 53 I2C_SCL1 (I/O)
PDM_DATA PCM_SYNC I2S_WS AUD_LRCLK 52 51 I2C_SDA1 (I/O)
PDM_CLK PCM_CLK I2S_SCK AUD_BCLK 50 49 BATT_VIN / 3 (I - ADC) (0 to 3.3V)
G4 / BUS4 48 47 PWM1
G3 / BUS3 46 45 GND
G2 / BUS2 44 43 CAN_TX
G1 / BUS1 42 41 CAN_RX
G0 / BUS0 40 39 GND
A1 38 37 USBHOST_D-
GND 36 35 USBHOST_D+
A0 34 33 GND
PWM0 32 31 Module Key
Module Key 30 29 Module Key
Module Key 28 27 Module Key
Module Key 26 25 Module Key
Module Key 24 23 SWDIO
UART_TX2 (O) 22 21 SWDCK
UART_RX2 (I) 20 19 UART_RX1 (I)
CAM_TRIG D1 18 17 UART_TX1 (0)
I2C_INT# 16 15 UART_CTS1 (I)
I2C_SCL (I/0) 14 13 UART_RTS1 (O)
I2C_SDA (I/0) 12 11 BOOT (I - Open Drain)
D0 10 9 USB_VIN
SWO G11 8 7 GND
RESET# (I - Open Drain) 6 5 USB_D-
3.3V_EN 4 3 USB_D+
3.3V 2 1 GND
Signal Group Signal I/O Description Voltage
Power 3.3V I 3.3V Source 3.3V
GND Return current path 0V
USB_VIN I USB VIN compliant to USB 2.0 specification.
Connect to pins on Processor Board that require 5V for USB functionality.
4.8-5.2V
RTC_3V_BATT I 3V provided by external coin cell or mini battery. Max draw = 100μA.
Connect to pins maintaining an RTC during power loss. Can be left NC.
3V
3.3V_EN O Controls the carrier board's main voltage regulator. Voltage above 1V will enable 3.3V power path. 3.3V
BATT_VIN/3 I Carrier board raw voltage over 3. 1/3 resistor divider is implemented on carrier board.
Amplify the analog signal as needed for full 0-3.3V range
3.3V
Reset Reset I Input to processor. Open drain with pullup on processor board. Pulling low resets processor. 3.3V
Boot I Input to processor. Open drain with pullup on processor board. Pulling low puts processor into special boot mode. Can be left NC. 3.3V
USB USB_D± I/O USB Data ±. Differential serial data interface compliant to USB 2.0 specification. If UART is required for programming, USB± must be routed to a USB-to-serial conversion IC on the processor board.
USB Host USBHOST_D± I/O For processors that support USB Host Mode. USB Data±. Differential serial data interface compliant to USB 2.0 specification. Can be left NC.
CAN CAN_RX I CAN Bus receive data. 3.3V
CAN_TX O CAN Bus transmit data. 3.3V
UART UART_RX1 I UART receive data. 3.3V
UART_TX1 O UART transmit data. 3.3V
UART_RTS1 O UART request to send. 3.3V
UART_CTS1 I UART clear to send. 3.3V
UART_RX2 I 2nd UART receive data. 3.3V
UART_TX2 O 2nd UART transmit data. 3.3V
I2C I2C_SCL I/O I2C clock. Open drain with pullup on carrier board. 3.3V
I2C_SDA I/O I2C data. Open drain with pullup on carrier board 3.3V
I2C_INT# I Interrupt notification from carrier board to processor. Open drain with pullup on carrier board. Active LOW 3.3V
I2C_SCL1 I/O 2nd I2C clock. Open drain with pullup on carrier board. 3.3V
I2C_SDA1 I/O 2nd I2C data. Open drain with pullup on carrier board. 3.3V
SPI SPI_COPI O SPI Controller Output/Peripheral Input. 3.3V
SPI_CIPO I SPI Controller Input/Peripheral Output. 3.3V
SPI_SCK O SPI Clock. 3.3V
SPI_CS# O SPI Chip Select. Active LOW. Can be routed to GPIO if hardware CS is unused. 3.3V
SPI/SDIO SPI_SCK1/SDIO_CLK O 2nd SPI Clock. Secondary use is SDIO Clock. 3.3V
SPI_COPI1/SDIO_CMD I/O 2nd SPI Controller Output/Peripheral Input. Secondary use is SDIO command interface. 3.3V
SPI_CIPO1/SDIO_DATA0 I/O 2nd SPI Peripheral Input/Controller Output. Secondary use is SDIO data exchange bit 0. 3.3V
SDIO_DATA1 I/O SDIO data exchange bit 1. 3.3V
SDIO_DATA2 I/O SDIO data exchange bit 2. 3.3V
SPI_CS1/SDIO_DATA3 I/O 2nd SPI Chip Select. Secondary use is SDIO data exchange bit 3. 3.3V
Audio AUD_MCLK O Audio master clock. 3.3V
AUD_OUT/PCM_OUT/I2S_OUT/CAM_MCLK O Audio data output. PCM synchronous data output. I2S serial data out. Camera master clock. 3.3V
AUD_IN/PCM_IN/I2S_IN/CAM_PCLK I Audio data input. PCM syncrhonous data input. I2S serial data in. Camera periphperal clock. 3.3V
AUD_LRCLK/PCM_SYNC/I2S_WS/PDM_DATA I/O Audio left/right clock. PCM syncrhonous data SYNC. I2S word select. PDM data. 3.3V
AUD_BCLK/PCM_CLK/I2S_CLK/PDM_CLK O Audio bit clock. PCM clock. I2S continuous serial clock. PDM clock. 3.3V
SWD SWDIO I/O Serial Wire Debug I/O. Connect if processor board supports SWD. Can be left NC. 3.3V
SWDCK I Serial Wire Debug clock. Connect if processor board supports SWD. Can be left NC. 3.3V
ADC A0 I Analog to digital converter 0. Amplify the analog signal as needed to enable full 0-3.3V range. 3.3V
A1 I Analog to digital converter 1. Amplify the analog signal as needed to enable full 0-3.3V range. 3.3V
PWM PWM0 O Pulse width modulated output 0. 3.3V
PWM1 O Pulse width modulated output 1. 3.3V
Digital D0 I/O General digital input/output pin. 3.3V
D1/CAM_TRIG I/O General digital input/output pin. Camera trigger. 3.3V
General/Bus G0/BUS0 I/O General purpose pins. Any unused processor pins should be assigned to Gx with ADC + PWM capable pins given priority (0, 1, 2, etc.) positions. The intent is to guarantee PWM, ADC and Digital Pin functionality on respective ADC/PWM/Digital pins. Gx pins do not guarantee ADC/PWM function. Alternative use is pins can support a fast read/write 8-bit or 4-bit wide bus. 3.3V
G1/BUS1 I/O 3.3V
G2/BUS2 I/O 3.3V
G3/BUS3 I/O 3.3V
G4/BUS4 I/O 3.3V
G5/BUS5 I/O 3.3V
G6/BUS6 I/O 3.3V
G7/BUS7 I/O 3.3V
G8 I/O General purpose pin 3.3V
G9/ADC_D-/CAM_HSYNC I/O Differential ADC input if available. Camera horizontal sync. 3.3V
G10/ADC_D+/CAM_VSYNC I/O Differential ADC input if available. Camera vertical sync. 3.3V
G11/SWO I/O General purpose pin. Serial Wire Output 3.3V
M.2 Pin# MicroMod Pin Name Board Connections Description
1 GND GND
mikroBUS™ Socket - GND
Ground plane
2 3.3V 3.3V
mikroBUS™ Socket - +3.3V
Regulated 3.3V via USB-C
3 USB_D+ -- USB D+ connection for Processor Board
4 3.3V_EN -- Voltage regulator enable input
5 USB_D- -- USB D- connection for Processor Board
6 RESET RESET Button Connected to RESET Button
Reset is active LOW
9 USB_VIN mikroBUS™ Socket - +5V Input voltage from USB
10 D0 D0
mikroBUS™ Socket - INT
Digital I/O pin
11 BOOT BOOT Button Connected to BOOT Button
Boot is active LOW
12 I2C_SDA SDA
Qwiic Connector - SDA
mikroBUS™ Socket - SDA
I2C data signal for Qwiic devices
14 I2C_SCL SCL
Qwiic Connector - SCL
mikroBUS™ Socket - SCL
I2C clock signal for Qwiic devices
16 I2C_INT INT I2C interrupt pin
17 UART_TX1 mikroBUS™ Socket - TX UART transmit data pin
18 D1 D1
mikroBUS™ Socket - RST
Digital I/O pin
19 UART_RX1 mikroBUS™ Socket - RX UART receive data pin
32 PWM0 mikroBUS™ Socket - PWM PWM output pin
34 A0 mikroBUS™ Socket - AN ADC input pin
55 SPI_CS CS
mikroBUS™ Socket - CS
SPI Chip Select
57 SPI_SCK SCK
mikroBUS™ Socket - SCK
SPI Clock signal
59 SPI_COPI COPI
mikroBUS™ Socket - MOSI
SPI Controller Out/Peripheral In signal
61 SPI_CIPO CIPO
mikroBUS™ Socket - MISO
SPI Controller In/Peripheral Out signal

Breakout Pins

The mikroBUS™ carrier board features a 3.3V, a ground, seven I/O breakout pins. The functionality of these pins are detailed in the table above.

breakout pins
Breakout pins on the mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

JTAG Pins

The mikroBUS™ carrier board includes JTAG PTH pins for a JTAG header, to be used with one of the recommended MikroElektronica mikroProg programmers. The JTAG pins breakout the SWD (software debug) pins to the MicroMod processor board.

JTAG pins
JTAG pins on the mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

mikroBUS™ Socket

The most significant feature of this board, is the addition of the mikroBUS™ socket, which provides a drop-in interface for MikroElektronka's ecosystem of Click boards™ (over 1079 as of September 2021).

The mikroBUS™ socket comprises a pair of 8-pin female headers with a standardized pin configuration. The pins consists of three groups of communications pins (SPI, UART and I2C), six additional pins (PWM, Interrupt, Analog input, Reset and Chip select), and two power groups (3.3V and 5V).

mikroBUS™ socket
Standardized pin connections for the mikroBUS™ scoket. (Click to enlarge)

mikroBUS™ Socket
Pin Name
Carrier Board's
Processor Pin
mikroBUS™ Socket
I/O Direction
Description
5V USB_VIN Input Power supply: 4.75~5.5V
3.3V 3.3V Input Power supply: 3.3V
GND - - Ground
SCK SCK (57) Input SPI - Clock signal
CIPO CIPO (59) Output SPI - Data from mikroBUS™ socket
COPI COPI (61) Input SPI - Data to mikroBUS™ socket
CS CS0 (55) Input SPI - Chip select for mikroBUS™ socket
SCL SCL (14) Input/Output I2C - Clock signal
SDA SDA (12) Input/Output I2C - Data signal to/from mikroBUS™ socket
TX TX1 (17) Input TX - Serial data to mikroBUS™ socket
RX RX1 (19) Output RX - Serial data from mikroBUS™ socket
RST D1 (18) Input Reset signal to mikroBUS™ socket
INT D0 (10) Output Interrupt trigger from mikroBUS™ socket
AN A0 (34) Output Analog output from mikroBUS™ socket
PWM PWM0 (32) Input PWM signal to mikroBUS™ socket

*For more information about the mikroBUS™ socket, click here for the mikroBUS™ standard specifications.

Qwiic Connector

The Qwiic connectors are provided for users to seamlessly integrate with SparkFun's Qwiic Ecosystem.

qwiic connectors
Qwiic connector on the MicroMod Qwiic carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

What is Qwiic?

The Qwiic system is intended a quick, hassle-free cabling/connector system for I2C devices. Qwiic is actually a play on words between "quick" and I2C or "iic".

Features of the Qwiic System

Keep your soldering iron at bay.

Cables plug easily between boards making quick work of setting up a new prototype. We currently offer three different lengths of Qwiic cables as well as a breadboard friendly cable to connect any Qwiic enabled board to anything else. Initially you may need to solder headers onto the shield to connect your platform to the Qwiic system but once that’s done it’s plug and go!

Qwiic Cable and Board

Qwiic cables connected to Spectral Sensor Breakout

Minimize your mistakes.

How many times have you swapped the SDA and SCL wires on your breadboard hoping the sensor will start working? The Qwiic connector is polarized so you know you’ll have it wired correctly, every time, from the start.

The PCB connector is part number SM04B-SRSS (Datasheet) or equivalent. The mating connector used on cables is part number SHR04V-S-B or equivalent. This is a common and low cost connector.

JST Connector

1mm pitch, 4-pin JST connector

Expand with ease.

It’s time to leverage the power of the I2C bus! Most Qwiic boards will have two or more connectors on them allowing multiple devices to be connected.

Hadware Assembly

For those unfamiliar with the MicroMod ecosystem, be sure to review the Getting Started with MicroMod guide.

Getting Started with MicroMod

October 21, 2020

Dive into the world of MicroMod - a compact interface to connect a microcontroller to various peripherals via the M.2 Connector!

MicroMod Processor Board

To get started users will need a compatible processor board. Insert the MicroMod processor board into the M.2 socket for the processor board at an angle, with its edge connector aligned to the matching slots.

Note: The dimensions of the processor board's edge connector prevents it from mating with the slots of the M.2 socket in reverse. As an extra safeguard, the screw insert is spaced to only match the screw key of MicroMod processor boards.

When inserted properly, the processor board will rest at an angle:

MicroMod processor board inserted into the carrier board
Inserting a processor board into the M.2 socket. (Click to enlarge)

To secure the processor board, gently hold down on the board and attach the M.2 screw with a Phillip's head (PH0 or PH1) screw driver. Below, is an example of an assembled MicroMod system:

MicroMod processor board attached to the carrier board
A processor board attached to the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

JTAG Programming (preferred)

To program the processor board on the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board, users will need a JTAG adapter to convert the .1" (100 mil) header spacing on the programmer cable to the .05" (50 mil) header spacing of the JTAG pins on the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board. Additionally, users will need to solder on a compatible JTAG header to their board.

Note: Users should verify that the connections from the programmer matches up to the correct pins on the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board to avoid damaging the MCU of the processor board.

CODEGRIP programmer
mikroProg programmer

Programming the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board through the JTAG pins. (Click to enlarge)

JTAG Header

With the preferred programming method, Necto Studio, users will program the processor board on the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board through the JTAG pins. Therefore, users will need to solder on a JTAG header for the programmer to connect to.

Note: Users should double check for solder bridges and clean off any flux residue to avoid potential issues with programming.

Soldering a JTAG header
Soldering a JTAG header to the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

JTAG Adapter

With the recommended programmer, users will need an adapter to convert the .1" (100 mil) header spacing on the programmer cable to the .05" (50 mil) header spacing of the pins on board, .

Note: Users should verify that the pinout for the programmer and adapter match up to the corresponding pins of the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board to avoid damaging the MCU of the processor board. Additionally, preventative measures should be taken if there is a risk that the pins from the adapter could contact the processor board.

JTAG adapter
The JTAG adatpter with pins exposed over the processor board. (Click to enlarge)
tape used as protection
Tape used to prevent shorts on the processor board. (Click to enlarge)

USB Programming (not preferred)

A processor board utilized on the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board, can also be connect to a computer with a USB-C cable and programmed with the Arduino IDE. Depending on the processor board, users may need to install drivers (if they have not done so already).

Note: Make sure that the correct board definitions are installed in the Arduino IDE, for the selected processor board. For help installing board definitions, use the MicroMod processor boards landing page and review the associated hookup guide for that hardware.

Installing Board Definitions in the Arduino IDE

September 9, 2020

How do I install a custom Arduino board/core? It's easy! This tutorial will go over how to install an Arduino board definition using the Arduino Board Manager. We will also go over manually installing third-party cores, such as the board definitions required for many of the SparkFun development boards.

To upload a sketch to the STM32 processor board (recommended), users will need to:

  1. Connect a USB-C cable between the board and the computer
  2. Hold down the BOOT button
  3. Toggle the RESET button
  4. Hit the upload button in the Arduino IDE, to program the sketch
    • Make sure to use the correct setting in the Tools menu for the processor board
  5. Once the upload process has completed in the Arduino IDE, the BOOT button can be released

Programming steps
Steps for programming the STM32 processor board with the Arduino IDE. (Click to enlarge)

Battery

For remote applications, the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board can be powered through its 2-pin JST battery connector. Additionally, users may be interested in utilizing a solar panel and USB-C cable to recharge their battery.

Battery connected to the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board
The MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board with a battery attached. (Click to enlarge)
Solar Panel Charger - 10W

Solar Panel Charger - 10W

PRT-16835
$18.95
1
USB 3.1 Cable A to C - 3 Foot

USB 3.1 Cable A to C - 3 Foot

CAB-14743
$5.50
4

Note: DO NOT remove batteries by pulling on their wires. Instead, it is recommended that pair of dikes (i.e. diagonal wire cutters), pliers, or tweezers be used to pull on the JST connector housing, to avoid damaging the battery wiring.

Disconnect battery w/ dikes
Using a pair of dikes to disconnect a battery. (Click to enlarge)

mikroBUS™ Socket

The MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board has a mikroBUS™ Socket, where a Click board™ can be inserted.

Attached click board
A Click board™ inserted into the mikroBUS™ socket of the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board.

Note: To remove a Click board™, slowly and carefully wiggle it out of the mikroBUS™ socket to avoid bending the header pins on their Click board™.

The header also allows users to connect jumper wires to devices that may not have the mikroBUS™ pin layout to interface with.

jumper wiring
A device connected to the mikroBUS™ socket of the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board with jumper wires.

Serial Data Output

Note: Some of the examples for the Click board™ libraries in Necto Studio, utilize a serial data output to verify functionality. In order to access the serial data output from the mikroBUS™ socket, users can use a Terminal Click Board™, serial-to-UART adapter, and jumper wires.

terminal click stack on
Weather and Terminal Click boards™ inserted into the mikroBUS™ socket of the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board and connected to a serial-to-UART adapter. (Click to enlarge)

To breakout the pins of the mikroBUS socket™, a Terminal Click board™ can be stacked between a Click board™ and the mikroBUS socket™.

terminal click stack on
Weather and Terminal Click boards™ inserted into the mikroBUS™ socket of the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

Once the serial pins have been broken out with the Terminal Click board™, users can access the serial pins with a serial-to-UART adapter and some jumper wire. The pin connections are summarized in the table below and illustrated in the following images.

Terminal Click™ Serial Breakout Description
RX RXI Serial data output from Click board™ to MCU
TX TXO Serial data output from MCU to Click board™
3.3V VCC Power input to mikroBUS socket™
GND GND Ground

Top view of jumper wire connections. (Click to enlarge)

Front view of the jumper wire connections. (Click to enlarge)

Qwiic Devices

To connect Qwiic devices to the carrier board, users will need Qwiic cables; most of these devices can also be daisy chained together. For more information, check out our Qwiic ecosystem page.

Attaching Qwiic devices to carrier board
Attaching Qwiic devices to the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

Software Overview

Necto Studio

Necto Studio is a productive cross-platform integrated developing environment provided by MikroElektronika and is available on Windows, Linux, and macOS. It includes C compilers, mikroSDK 2.0, package manager, and USB or WiFi Debugger capabilities with flexible licensing options. The development environment features intelligent code completion, auto-close brackets, and drag and drop visual elements.

Users can find their favorite Click Board library and working example through the Package Manager. Users will also be notified about new versions of installed packages, and easily update in one click.

MikroElektronika even provides first-time users with the longest time trial on the market - Get fully unlocked, feature-rich NECTO for three months, and explore it to the most delicate details before purchase!

For more information about NECTO Studio, please visit the product page.

mikroSDK

mikroSDK 2.0 makes application code portable and reusable on many different platforms and architectures, with virtually no code changes. It is a collection of open-source software libraries with unified API and software development tools. Everything you need to start developing, and prototyping cross-platform embedded applications, including Click board™ applications and GUIs for embedded devices.

mikroSDK 2.0 is open-source, and it’s natively supported in NECTO Studio. The video below, is a brief overview of how to use the mikroSDK:

Additional Resources:

For more details on Necto Studio, check out our getting started guide below:

Getting Started with Necto Studio

March 4, 2022

Necto Studio is a user friendly development environment for users looking to get started with MikroElektronika's MIKROE products.
  • When creating a hardware setup, users will want to select:
    • mikroC AI for ARM compiler
    • mikroSDK (latest)
    • MicroMod Carrier Board
    • STM32F405RG-Tx (should be only option)
    • No display
    • CODEGRIP Programmer (recommended)
      • To be able to debug and program the MCU from Necto Studio, users will want to configure the following target option parameters:
        target options
        Target options for the CODEGRIP programmer in Necto Studio. (Click to enlarge)
      • Erase Type: Erase and unlock
      • Connection: Under reset
      • Hold on Connect: Enabled
    • For more details, check out the Setups section of the Necto Studio getting started guide.
  • For the CODEGRIP programmer (recommended), users will need to link with the programmer and configure the programming target in the CODEGRIP Suite:
    • MCU: STM32F405RG
    • Protocol: SWD
    • Connection: Under reset
    • Halt on Connect: Enabled
    • For more details, check out the Programmer Configuration section of the Necto Studio getting started guide.

Arduino IDE

Note: If users intend to use the Arduino IDE, we recommend that novice users select a Click board™ that is supported with an Arduino library. Otherwise, users will have difficulties programming their board to utilize the associated Click board™.

While not the preferred method for programming their board, users can use the Arduino IDE to upload sketches to the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board. We recommend that users select a Click board™ with a supporting Arduino library for their processor board. Below, are a few tips to get users started.

Getting Started with MicroMod

For those unfamiliar with the MicroMod ecosystem, be sure to review the Getting Started with MicroMod guide. Also, make sure that the correct board definitions are installed in the Arduino IDE, for the associated processor board.

Getting Started with MicroMod

October 21, 2020

Dive into the world of MicroMod - a compact interface to connect a microcontroller to various peripherals via the M.2 Connector!

Board Definitions

Make sure that the correct board definitions are installed in the Arduino IDE, for the connected processor board. Depending on the processor board, users may need to install drivers (if they have not done so already). For help installing board definitions, use the MicroMod processor boards landing page and review the associated hookup guide for that hardware.

Installing Board Definitions in the Arduino IDE

September 9, 2020

How do I install a custom Arduino board/core? It's easy! This tutorial will go over how to install an Arduino board definition using the Arduino Board Manager. We will also go over manually installing third-party cores, such as the board definitions required for many of the SparkFun development boards.

Arduino Library

Users will need to add the supporting Arduino library for their Click board™. If there isn't a supporting Arduino library, users will need to write a sketch to utilize that device; we DO NOT provide or offer support on custom code.

Note: We DO NOT provide or offer support for custom code. We highly recommend that novice users verify that there is a compatible Arduino library for the processor board and the device or Click board™ they wish to connect.

Note: This tutorial assumes users have the latest version of the Arduino IDE installed. If this is your first time using Arduino, please review our tutorial on installing the Arduino IDE. If you have not previously installed an Arduino library, please check out our installation guide:

Installing an Arduino Library

January 11, 2013

How do I install a custom Arduino library? It's easy! This tutorial will go over how to install an Arduino library using the Arduino Library Manager. For libraries not linked with the Arduino IDE, we will also go over manually installing an Arduino library.

Necto Studio Example

In this example, we will be using the Weather Click board™ and outputting the BME280 sensor's data to the UART Terminal. To get started, follow the instructions below.

Required Materials

For this example, users will need a MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board, STM32 processor board, phillips head screwdriver, Weather Click, MIKROE CODEGRIP for STM32 programmer, 50-100mil JTAG adapter, and access to a computer with the Necto Studio and the CODEGRIP Suite installed:

SparkFun MicroMod STM32 Processor

SparkFun MicroMod STM32 Processor

DEV-17713
$16.50
SparkFun MicroMod mikroBUS Carrier Board

SparkFun MicroMod mikroBUS Carrier Board

DEV-18710
$19.95
MIKROE Weather Click

MIKROE Weather Click

SEN-18823
$21.95
MicroMod Screwdriver

MicroMod Screwdriver

TOL-19012
$0.50
MIKROE CODEGRIP for STM32

MIKROE CODEGRIP for STM32

PGM-19105
$129.95
MIKROE 50-100mil Adapter

MIKROE 50-100mil Adapter

PGM-19220
$14.95

Users will also need some soldering equipment and a JTAG header to connect the programmer to the board:

Solder Lead Free - 100-gram Spool

Solder Lead Free - 100-gram Spool

TOL-09325
$9.95
7
Weller WLC100 Soldering Station

Weller WLC100 Soldering Station

TOL-14228
$67.95
2
Chip Quik No-Clean Flux Pen  - 10mL

Chip Quik No-Clean Flux Pen - 10mL

TOL-14579
$8.95
4
Header - 2x5 Pin (Male, 1.27mm)

Header - 2x5 Pin (Male, 1.27mm)

PRT-15362
$1.75

To read the data output from the Weather Click example code, users will also need a Terminal Click, serial breakout board, jumper wires, and a USB cable:

Jumper Wires Premium 6" M/F Pack of 10

Jumper Wires Premium 6" M/F Pack of 10

PRT-09140
$4.50
1
USB 3.1 Cable A to C - 3 Foot

USB 3.1 Cable A to C - 3 Foot

CAB-14743
$5.50
4
SparkFun Serial Basic Breakout - CH340C and USB-C

SparkFun Serial Basic Breakout - CH340C and USB-C

DEV-15096
$9.95
7
MIKROE Terminal Click

MIKROE Terminal Click

DEV-18961
$6.95

For users who haven't soldered before and/or need to install the CH340 driver for the Serial Basic breakout, the following tutorials should be reviewed before proceeding further:

How to Solder: Through-Hole Soldering

This tutorial covers everything you need to know about through-hole soldering.

SparkFun Serial Basic CH340C Hookup Guide

SparkFun Serial Basic Breakout takes advantage of USB-C and is an easy-to-use USB-to-Serial adapter based on the CH340C IC from WCH. With USB-C you can get up to three times the power delivery over the previous USB generation and has the convenient feature of being reversable.

How to Install CH340 Drivers

How to install CH340 drivers (if you need them) on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux.

Getting Started with Necto Studio

Necto Studio is a user friendly development environment for users looking to get started with MikroElektronika's MIKROE products.

Hardware Assembly

Hardware assembly is relatively straight forward, attach the STM32 processor board to the MicroMod slot, solder on the JTAG header, insert the Click boards™ into the mikroBUS™ socket, connect the carrier board to the programmer, connect the Serial Basic breakout, and then link the programmer to the computer.

MicroMod processor board attached to the carrier board
The STM32 processor board attached to the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

If users haven't done so, solder the JTAG header to the board.

Soldering a JTAG header
Soldering a JTAG header to the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

To breakout the serial pins of the mikroBUS™ socket, the Terminal Click board™ needs to be stacked between the Weather Click board™ and the mikroBUS™ socket.

Attached click boards
The Weather and Terminal Click boards™ inserted into the mikroBUS™ socket of the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board. (Click to enlarge)

Once the serial pins have been broken out with the Terminal Click board™, users can access the serial pins with a Serial Basic breakout and some jumper wire.

Connected serial-to-UART adapter
The Serial Basic breakout connected to the Terminal Click board™. (Click to enlarge)

The pin connections are summarized in the table below and illustrated more closely in the images (click to enlarge).

Terminal Click™ Serial Breakout Description
RX RXI Serial data output from Click board™ to MCU
TX TXO Serial data output from MCU to Click board™
3.3V VCC Power input to mikroBUS socket™
GND GND Ground

Wiring between the Serial Basic breakout and the Terminal Click board™. (Click to enlarge)

Finally, connect the CODEGRIP programmer with a JTAG adapter. Then, connect both the programmer and Serial Basic breakout to the computer.

CODEGRIP Programmer
Connecting the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board to the computer. (Click to enlarge)

If everything was connected properly, the POWER and ACTIVE, and USB LINK LED indicators on the programmer will turn on. Once the ACTIVE LED indicator stops blinking, the CODEGRIP programmer is ready to be used.

programmer LEDs
Indicator LEDs on the CODEGRIP programmer. (Click to enlarge)

Software Setup

On the computer, users should have Necto Studio and the CODEGRIP Suite installed.

  • In the CODEGRIP Suite, users will need to link with the programmer and configure the programming target:

    • MCU: STM32F4045RG
    • Protocol: SWD
    • Connection: Under reset
    • Halt on Connect: Enabled
    NOTE: Users won't need to enable the power output on the programmer because the power connection from the Serial breakout board. This will provide enough power for the carrier board.

    After the programmer has been linked and the MCU target has been configured, users should be able to perform a target verification with the detect function.

    target detected
    Detecting the target MCU in the CODEGRIP Suite. (Click to enlarge)

    For more details, check out the Programmer Configuration section of the Necto Studio getting started guide.

  • In Necto Studio, if users should have already created a hardware configuration through the Setups page. The hardware configuration should include the following options:

    • mikroC AI for ARM compiler
    • mikroSDK (latest)
    • MicroMod Carrier Board
    • STM32F4045RG-Tx (should be only option)
    • No display
    • CODEGRIP Programmer
      • To be able to debug and program the MCU from Necto Studio, users will want to configure the following target option parameters:
        target options
        Target options for the CODEGRIP programmer in Necto Studio. (Click to enlarge)
      • Erase Type: Erase and unlock
      • Connection: Under reset
      • Hold on Connect: Enabled

    setup example
    Hardware configuration in Setups page of Necto Studio. (Click to enlarge)

    For more details, check out the Setups section of the Necto Studio getting started guide.

  • In the package manager of Necto Studio, users will need to install the Weather Click library.

    library installation
    The Weather Click library installed through the Package Manager page of Necto Studio. (Click to enlarge)

    For more details, check out the Package Manager section of the Necto Studio getting started guide.

  • Once the Weather Click library has been installed, users will have access the associated example for the library. From the Package Manager page, users should be able to create a new project by clicking on the Open Example button.

Running the Example Code

After the project has been created for the Weather Click example, users will be able to program the example onto their carrier board. This can be done either of two methods; however, the simplest method would be to use the Program button in Necto Studio.

To receive and display the serial data output from the example, users will need to open the UART Terminal in Necto Studio by selecting Tools > UART Terminal from the drop down menu.

In the UART Terminal, users will need to:

  • Select the Port for the Serial Basic breakout
  • Set the Baud rate to 115200 bps
  • Click on the Connect button

    UART Terminal
    UART Terminal configuration to connect to the Serial Basic breakout. (Click to enlarge)

If the connection succeeds, users should then see data from the BME280 sensor being displayed in the Receive text box.

data output
The BME280 sensor data being displayed in the UART Terminal. (Click to enlarge)

NOTE: If the data doesn't output immediately, try power cycling the carrier board, by disconnecting and reconnecting the power from the Serial Basic breakout.

Troubleshooting Tips

Below, we have also included some troubleshooting tips for issues that you may come across.

  • One of our employees compiled a great list of troubleshooting tips based on the most common customer issues. This is the perfect place to start.

Hardware

For users looking for technical assistance specifically related to the hardware, click on this link. There you will find, basic troubleshooting tips and instructions to get started with posting a topic in our forum. Our technical support team will do their best to assist you.

Software

For users looking for technical assistance specifically related to the software, click on this link. There users can get started with posting a topic in MikroElektronika forum.

For commercial businesses, MikroElektronika also offers a Premium Technical Support package, which can be purchased from their website.

Sign-in or CODEGRIP Installation Issues

On Windows 10 PCs, if users experience an issues signing in to Necto Studio or come across an Error:UnknownNetworkError error message, their computer may be missing a Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 Runtime Library.

UnknownNetworkError
Failure to download CODEGRIP Suite and Error:UnknownNetworkError error message. (Click to enlarge)

To install the missing Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 Runtime Library, download the vcredist_x64.zip file (or click the button below), extract the folder, and execute the contained installation setup file vcredist_x64.exe.

Example Code Compilation Error

Users who select a Generic board in their hardware setup, may run into a compilation error. This error is because the pins for the Generic board are undefined, by default. Users will need to declare the pins utilized by their code for the build to compile.

generic board error
Compilation error message. (Click to enlarge)

Programming Issues

To detect a target MCU, it must be at least powered and have the SWD pins connected to the programmer.

Power

The carrier board has to be powered by in order for the programmer to detect the target MCU on the processor board. Users can power the carrier board externally or through the CODEGRIP programmer (by enabling it through the CODEGRIP Suite).

CODEGRIP Suite

Users should verify that they configure the target MCU properly.

Users can also manually program the MCU through the CODEGRIP Suite, by loading the compiled *.hex file of the project, built in Necto Studio and the writing it to the target MCU.

For more details, check out the Programmer and Debugger Configuration section of the Necto Studio getting started guide.

Necto Studio - Target Options

In order to program a MCU through Necto Studio, users will need to configure the Target options of the CODEGRIP programmer when creating their setup:

  • Erase Type: Erase and unlock
  • Connection: Under reset
  • Hold on Connect: Enabled

target options
Target options for the CODEGRIP programmer. (Click to enlarge)

No Data Output

If the data doesn't output immediately, try power cycling the carrier board, by disconnecting and reconnecting the power from the Serial Basic breakout.

Otherwise, verify that the MCU is being powered sufficiently. If the MCU isn't being powered sufficiently, it may not run or output data at the appropriate logic levels.

  • Users can double check the voltage through the CODEGRIP programmer in the CODEGRIP Suite. Open the POWER menu and select the newly unfolded Outputs menu item. Users should see the the voltage provided to the target MCU in the Measurements section:

    voltage measurement
    Voltage measurement for power to the target MCU through the CODEGRIP Suite. (Click to enlarge)

Resources and Going Further

For more on the MicroMod mikroBUS™ carrier board, check out the links below:

MicroMod mikroBUS Carrier Documentation

MicroMod Documentation:

For more project inspirations, check out these other MIKROE Click Boards™:

MIKROE 6DOF IMU 12 Click

MIKROE 6DOF IMU 12 Click

SEN-18793
$21.95
MIKROE Weather Click

MIKROE Weather Click

SEN-18823
$21.95
MIKROE Humidity Click

MIKROE Humidity Click

SEN-19118
$24.95
MIKROE GNSS 8 Click

MIKROE GNSS 8 Click

GPS-19128
$54.95
MIKROE RTC 13 Click

MIKROE RTC 13 Click

DEV-19130
$14.95
MIKROE ADC 9 Click

MIKROE ADC 9 Click

DEV-19461
$16.95
MIKROE Ambient 11 Click

MIKROE Ambient 11 Click

SEN-19505
$9.95
MIKROE RTC 16 Click

MIKROE RTC 16 Click

DEV-19652
$12.95