Installing Arduino IDE a learn.sparkfun.com tutorial

Available online at: http://sfe.io/t61

Contents

Introduction

This tutorial will walk you through downloading, installing, and testing the Arduino software (also known as the Arduino IDE - short for Integrated Development Environment). Before you jump to the page for your operating system, make sure you’ve got all the right equipment.

What you will need:

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An Arduino Uno

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An A-to-B USB Cable

Suggested Reading

If you’re new to Arduino in general, you want to check out this tutorial to familiarize yourself with everyone’s favorite microcontroller platform.


If you’re ready to get started, click on the link in the column on the left that matches up with your operating system, or you can jump to your operating system here.

Windows

This page will show you how to install and test the Arduino software with a Windows operating system (Windows 8, Windows 7, Vista, and XP).

Windows 8, 7, Vista, and XP

Windows 8

Windows 8 comes with a nice little security ‘feature’ that ‘protects’ you from unsigned driver installation. Some older versions of Arduino Uno come with unsigned drivers, so in order to use your Uno, you’ll have to tell Windows to disable driver signing. This issue has been addressed in newer releases of the Arduino IDE, but if you run into issues, you can try this fix first.

For a nice, step-by-step tutorial with pictures click here, otherwise the steps are outlined below.

To temporarily disable driver signing:

To permanently disable driver signing (recommended, but has some minor security implications):

Windows 7, Vista, and XP

Installing the Drivers for the Arduino Uno (from Arduino.cc)

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For earlier versions of the Arduino boards (e.g.Arduino Duemilanove, Nano, or Diecimila) check out this page for specific directions.

Launch and Blink!

After following the appropriate steps for your software install, we are now ready to test your first program with your Arduino board!

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Troubleshooting

This guide from Arduino has some more details and troubleshooting tips if you get stuck.

Mac

This page will show you how to install and test the Arduino software on a Mac computer running OSX.

FTDI Drivers

If you have an UNO, Mega2560, or Redboard, you shouldn’t need this step, so skip it!

Launch and Blink!

After following the appropriate steps for your software install, we are now ready to test your first program with your Arduino board!

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Troubleshooting

If you’re having problems, check out this troubleshooting guide from Arduino.

Linux

If you are a Linux user, you probably know that there are many different distribution ‘flavors’ of Linux out there. Unsurprisingly, installing Arduino is slightly different for many of these distributions. Luckily, the Arduino community has done an excellent job of providing instructions for most of the popular versions. Click on the link below that covers your flavor of Linux:

If the above directions did not work for you, or you don’t see your distribution, try this catch-all guide.

You can go to the download page and download the latest version of Arduino for Linux (there are 32-bit and 64-bit versions available) when your system is properly set up.

Launch and Blink!

After following the appropriate steps for your software install, we are now ready to test your first program with your Arduino board!

Troubleshooting

The Arduino Playground Linux section is a great resource for figuring out any problems with your Arduino installation.

Board Add-Ons with Arduino Board Manager

With Arduino v1.6.4+, a new boards manager feature makes it easy to add third-party boards (like the SparkFun Redboard, Digital Sandbox, and RedBot) to the Arduino IDE.

To start, highlight and copy (CTRL + C / CMD + C) the text below for the boards manager URL. You’ll need this to configure Arduino.

https://raw.githubusercontent.com/sparkfun/Arduino_Boards/master/IDE_Board_Manager/package_sparkfun_index.json

Open up Arduino:

Resources and Going Further

Now that you’ve got the Arduino software installed on your system and tested it with your Arduino board successfully, you’re ready for your next steps into the world of embedded electronics.

If you want to learn about some of the concepts that will help you build your projects, check out some of the following tutorials:

If you’d rather jump right in to building something, check out these links to projects here on learn as well as some other places to find Arduino-based projects:


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