Dialog ULP WiFi DA16200 R3 Shield Hookup Guide

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Contributors: Alex the Giant, Ell C
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Hardware Overview

There's a lot to cover with this board. Let's get started!

DA16200

At the heart of this board is the DA16200 from Dialog - a fully integrated Wi-FiĀ® module with ultra-low power consumption, 40 MHz crystal oscillator, 32.768 KHz RTC clock, RF Lumped RF filter, 4 M-byte flash memory, and an onboard chip antenna. This chip is chock full of features - for more information, refer to the datasheet.

The dialog module is at the bottom front middle of the board

Power

Power is available via a number of pins on the shield.

Power pins selected on the left side of the board as well as at the top

Wake

Integral to the ultra low power functionality is the wake-up controller. It is designed to wake up the DA16200 from a sleep mode by an external signal that selects either the rising edge or the falling edge on either WAKE1 or WAKE2. The RTC_PWR_KEY is used to enable the RTC block and switch between the various sleep modes. See the datasheet for more information.

Pins to wake from Low Power mode

Current Draw in Low Power Modes

Current Draw in Low Power Modes

UART

The DA16200 module has two UART interfaces. UART0 is used for updating the firmware to module, and UART1 is used for sending AT commands.

UART0 for the Dialog module sits at the top of the board.

UART0 pins are the second and third pins at the top of the board  from the right

UART1 is used for sending AT commands and is routed through a switch to communicate through either the hardware UART pins D0/D1 for RX/TX, or software UART through D9/D8 for RX/TX.

UART1 SW and HW pins and the switch are highlighted

SPI

SPI functionality is found on pins 10-13 on the right side of the board. If you wish to bypass the SPI pins and instead use the ADC on GPIOA0-GPIOA3, there are jumpers on the back of the board to accomplish this. Refer to the Jumpers section below for more information.

SPI pins 10-13 are highlighted as well as  GPIOA0-GPIOA3

DA16200 GPIO

General purpose IO pins for the Dialog module are available at the top of the board.

DA16200 specific GPIO

Qwiic Connector

A Qwiic connector is provided such that if you have an older RedBoard without a Qwiic connector, you can still add on a Qwiic sensor of your choice. Or you can use both the existing Qwiic connector on your RedBoard as well as the Qwiic connector on your shield. The RedBoard itself acts as the I2C controller. If you need help choosing a Qwiic sensor, check out our Qwiic Ecosystem.

The Qwiic connector is at the top right hand side of the board

Pins A0-A5

These pins are present on the board, but are not routed to anything on the shield.

Pins A0-A5 are highlighted on the lower left side of the board

Buttons

A general reset button is located on the upper left side of the board.

Arduino reset button is the button on the left of the board

Pressing and holding GPIOA7 will perform a factory reset, which clears configurations that might have been saved to the module.

GPIO A7 reset button is the button on the right of the board

Jumpers

JP1

Cutting this jumper removes power from the LED on the front of the board.

LED Jumper is on the right side of the back of the board - bottom most jumper on that side

Click on the image for a closer view of the jumper.

JP2

SPI CIPO is the default functionality for this shield. Cutting this jumper and closing the jumper between GPIOA0 and Header selects for GPIO A0 (Analog to Digital Converter functionality for Dialog Chip).

JP2 is the top right jumper set and chooses between D12 and GPIOA0

Click on the image for a closer view of the jumper.

JP3

SPI COPI is the default functionality for this shield. Cutting this jumper and closing the jumper between GPIOA1 and Header selects for GPIO A1 (Analog to Digital Converter functionality for Dialog Chip).

JP3 is the top left jumper set and chooses between D11 and GPIOA1

Click on the image for a closer view of the jumper.

JP4

SPI CS is the default functionality for this shield. Cutting this jumper and closing the jumper between GPIOA2 and Header selects for GPIO A2 (Analog to Digital Converter functionality for Dialog Chip).

JP4 is the bottom right jumper set and chooses between D10 and GPIOA2

Click on the image for a closer view of the jumper.

JP5

SPI SCK is the default functionality for this shield. Cutting this jumper and closing the jumper between GPIOA3 and Header selects for GPIO A3 (Analog to Digital Converter functionality for Dialog Chip).

JP5 is the bottom left jumper set and chooses between D13 and GPIOA3

Click on the image for a closer view of the jumper.

JP6

Selects SPI Interrupt to Arduino (default) or PWM to GPIO header

JP6 is below the Measurement jumper and JP5 and chooses between D3 and GPIOA10

Click on the image for a closer view of the jumper.

Current Measurement Jumper

To enable measurements and to isolate the power hungry devices, we've added a NC (normally closed) jumper. By cutting the jumper on the back of the board, the VDD trace to the module is interrupted. Soldering in a male jumper or wires into the accompanying holes will give you the ability to insert a current meter and precisely monitor how much current your application is consuming.

Current Measurement jumper holes are on the back of the board in the middle, midway up from the middle

I2C Jumper

Cutting this jumper will disable the pull up resistors on the bus.

I2C jumper is on the back of the board on the lower left

JTAG

An unpopulated JTAG footprint is available for more advanced users who need breakpoint level debugging. We recommend checking out our JTAG section for the compatible male header and a compatible JTAG programmer and debugger.

The JTAG footprint is on the front of the board just above the Dialog Module

Board Outline

Board measures 2.1 by 2.35 inches