DA16200 Thing Plus Hookup Guide

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Contributors: santaimpersonator, MAKIN-STUFF
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Introduction

The SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200 utilizes a highly integrated ultra-low power WiFi system on chip (SoC) that allows users to develop WiFi and IoT solutions.

SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200

SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200

WRL-19696
$34.95

Manufactured by Dialog (a subsidiary of Renesas), the DA16200MOD contains a 802.11b/g/n radio (PHY), a baseband processor, a media access controller (MAC), on-chip memory, and a host networking application processor, all on a single silicon die. The SoC has full offload capabilities to run the entire networking OS and TCP/IP stack on chip; therefore, an external network processor, CPU, or microcontroller are not required. The module is also Wi-Fi Alliance certified for IEEE802.11b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct, WPS functionalities in many countries including the United States (FCC), Canada (IC) and China (SRRC).

This board comes in a Thing Plus form factor, which includes a Qwiic and LiPo battery connectors, multiple GPIO pins, and JTAG PTH pins for debugging. The SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200 is ideal for your next IoT project, thanks in part to the multiple sleep modes that allow you to take advantage of current draws as low as 0.2 - 3.5 µA on the WiFi module.

Note: Please be aware that the Thing Plus - DA16200 has a 3.3V logic level voltage.

Required Materials

To get started, users will need a USB-C cable is needed to connect the DA16200 Thing Plus to a computer. (You may already have a some of these items; read through the guide and modify your cart accordingly.)

SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200

SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200

WRL-19696
$34.95
USB 3.1 Cable A to C - 3 Foot

USB 3.1 Cable A to C - 3 Foot

CAB-14743
$5.50
4

Optional Hardware

To connect Qwiic breakout boards for your project, Qwiic cables are required.

SparkFun Qwiic Cable Kit

SparkFun Qwiic Cable Kit

KIT-15081
$8.95
15
Flexible Qwiic Cable - 500mm

Flexible Qwiic Cable - 500mm

PRT-17257
$2.10
Flexible Qwiic Cable - 100mm

Flexible Qwiic Cable - 100mm

PRT-17259
$1.60
Flexible Qwiic Cable - 50mm

Flexible Qwiic Cable - 50mm

PRT-17260
$1.05
SparkFun GPS-RTK2 Board - ZED-F9P (Qwiic)

SparkFun GPS-RTK2 Board - ZED-F9P (Qwiic)

GPS-15136
$274.95
21
SparkFun GPS-RTK-SMA Breakout - ZED-F9P (Qwiic)

SparkFun GPS-RTK-SMA Breakout - ZED-F9P (Qwiic)

GPS-16481
$274.95
10
Tsunami Super WAV Trigger (Qwiic)

Tsunami Super WAV Trigger (Qwiic)

WIG-18159
$85.95
2
SparkFun RTK Facet

SparkFun RTK Facet

GPS-19984
$699.95
3

A single-cell Lithium-ion battery can be connected to the DA16200 Thing Plus for portability.

Lithium Ion Battery - 1Ah

Lithium Ion Battery - 1Ah

PRT-13813
$10.95
8
Lithium Ion Battery - 2Ah

Lithium Ion Battery - 2Ah

PRT-13855
$13.95
8
Lithium Ion Battery - 400mAh

Lithium Ion Battery - 400mAh

PRT-13851
$5.50
10
Lithium Ion Battery - 110mAh

Lithium Ion Battery - 110mAh

PRT-13853
$5.50
3

To modify the jumpers, users will need soldering equipment and/or a knife.

Solder Lead Free - 100-gram Spool

Solder Lead Free - 100-gram Spool

TOL-09325
$9.95
7
Weller WLC100 Soldering Station

Weller WLC100 Soldering Station

TOL-14228
$67.95
2
Chip Quik No-Clean Flux Pen  - 10mL

Chip Quik No-Clean Flux Pen - 10mL

TOL-14579
$8.95
4
Hobby Knife

Hobby Knife

TOL-09200
$3.50
2

Suggested Reading

For users who aren't familiar with the following concepts, we also recommend reading the following tutorials before continuing.

How to Install CH340 Drivers

How to install CH340 drivers (if you need them) on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux.

Dialog ULP WiFi DA16200 R3 Shield Hookup Guide

Add WiFi to your project with this hookup guide for our Dialog's Ultra Low Power DA16200 R3 shield!

MicroMod WiFi Function Board - DA16200 Hookup Guide

Add IoT functionality to any MicroMod project with the MicroMod WiFi function Board - DA16200!
New!

Getting Started with the DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK

Interested in the DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK? This guide covers setting up the SDK in the Eclipse IDE and how to program our boards with the DA16200 module.

How to Solder: Through-Hole Soldering

This tutorial covers everything you need to know about through-hole soldering.

Serial Communication

Asynchronous serial communication concepts: packets, signal levels, baud rates, UARTs and more!

Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI)

SPI is commonly used to connect microcontrollers to peripherals such as sensors, shift registers, and SD cards.

Pulse Width Modulation

An introduction to the concept of Pulse Width Modulation.

Logic Levels

Learn the difference between 3.3V and 5V devices and logic levels.

I2C

An introduction to I2C, one of the main embedded communications protocols in use today.

Analog vs. Digital

This tutorial covers the concept of analog and digital signals, as they relate to electronics.

Serial Terminal Basics

This tutorial will show you how to communicate with your serial devices using a variety of terminal emulator applications.

Connectivity of the Internet of Things

An overview of the different protocols that can be used for the development of Internet of Things (IoT)-based projects.

How to Work with Jumper Pads and PCB Traces

Handling PCB jumper pads and traces is an essential skill. Learn how to cut a PCB trace, add a solder jumper between pads to reroute connections, and repair a trace with the green wire method if a trace is damaged.

ARM Programming

How to program SAMD21 or SAMD51 boards (or other ARM processors).

Hardware Overview

Board Dimensions

The SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200's pin layout has a feather form factor. The board dimensions are illustrated in the drawing below.

Board Dimensions
Board dimensions (PDF) for the DA16200 Thing Plus, in inches. (Click to enlarge)

USB-C Connector

The USB connector is provided to power and interact with the board. For most users, it will be the primary programing interface for the DA16200 module.

USB-C Connector
USB-C connector on the DA16200 Thing Plus. (Click to enlarge)

CH340 Serial-to-UART

The CH340 allows the DA16200MOD to communicate with a computer/host device through the board's USB-C connection. This allows the board to show up as a device on the serial (or COM) port of the computer. Users will need to install the latest drivers for the computer to recognize the board (see Software Overview section).

Power

The DA16200 Thing Plus only requires 3.3V to power the board. However, the simplest method to power the board is through the USB-C connector. Alternatively, the 3V3, VBAT, and VUSB pins can also be used to supply power to the board.

  • VUSB:
    • The maximum voltage for the LDOs and charge controller is 6V.
    • The minimum voltage for the charge controller is 3.75V.
  • VBAT:
    • Should not be connected to anything other than a single-cell LiPo battery.
  • 3V3:
    • Requires a regulated 3.3V.
    • Powers the board and the Qwiic connector.

Power Connections
DA16200 Thing Plus power connections. (Click to enlarge)

The power pins that are available on the board, are detailed below: Below, is a general summary of the power circuitry on the board:

  • 3V3 - Provides a regulated 3.3V from the USB (5V) power and/or battery connections.
    • Powers the DA16200MOD, status LEDs (PWR and STAT), and 3.3V connections of the Qwiic connector (I2C bus) and debug pins.
    • The 3.3V XC6222 LDO regulator can source up to 700mA.
      • The output is controlled by the EN pin on the board.
    • Pin can also operate as an input from an external power source.
  • VUSB - The voltage from the USB-C connector, usually 5V.
    • Power source for the entire board.
      • Provides power to the 3.3V voltage regulator and the battery charging circuit.
    • Overides power from the battery through a P-channel MOSFET, when both are connected.
    • Contains ESD protection for the USB-C connection.
  • VBAT - The voltage from the JST battery connector; meant for single cell LiPo batteries.
    • Provides power to the 3.3V voltage regulator.
    • The MCP73831 linear charge management controller is powered from the USB (5V) power supply.
      • The charge controller is configured for 500mA (max) rate of charge to a connected battery.
  • GND - The common ground or the 0V reference for the voltage supplies.
  • Qwiic Connector - Provides a regulated 3.3V output.

Power Pins
DA16200 Thing Plus power pins. (Click to enlarge)

For more details, users can reference the schematic and the datasheets of the individual components in the power circuitry.

Power Status LED

The red, POWER LED will light up once 3.3V is supplied to the board; however, for most users, it will light up when 5V is supplied through the USB connection or when a LiPo battery is connected to the JST connector.

Power LED
DA16200 Thing Plus POWER status LED indicator. (Click to enlarge)

Charging Circuit

The charging circuit utilizes the MCP73831 linear charge management controller and is powered directly from the USB-C connector or VUSB. The controller is configured for a 500mA charge rate and active charging is indicated by the yellow, CHG LED. If the charge controller is shutdown or charging is complete, the CHG LED will turn off. For more information, please refer to the MCP73831 datasheet and the Indicator LEDs section below.

Power Control

The power source to the XC6222 is controlled by a P-channel MOSFET. In addition, the 3.3V regulated output from the XC6222 is controlled by the enable (EN) pin, broken out on the board. By default, the chip enable pin (EN) is pulled high, to enable the 3.3V output, supply voltage. To disable and shutdown the output voltage from the XC6222, the chip enable pin (EN) needs to be pulled low (i.e. shorted to ground (GND)). For more information, pleas refer to the XC6222.

Enable Pin
Enable pin on the DA16200 Thing Plus. (Click to enlarge)

DA16200MOD WiFi Module

The DA16200MOD is an ultra low power WiFi module manufactured by Dialog (a subsidiary of Renesas). It contains a 802.11b/g/n radio (PHY), a baseband processor, a media access controller (MAC), on-chip memory, and a host networking application processor, all on a single silicon die. The system on a chip (SoC) has full offload capabilities to run the entire networking OS and TCP/IP stack on chip; therefore, an external network processor, CPU, or microcontroller are not required. The DA16200 is ideal for your next IoT project, thanks to the multiple sleep modes that allow you to take advantage of current draws as low as 0.2 - 3.5 µA.

DA16200MOD WiFi Module
The DA16200MOD WiFi Module on the DA16200 Thing Plus. (Click to enlarge)

  • Operating voltage: 2.1 to 3.6 V
  • Operating temperature: -40 to 85 °C
  • Arm® Cortex®-M4F core w/ clock frequency of 30~160 MHz
    • ROM: 256 kB
    • SRAM: 512 kB
    • OTP: 2 kB
    • Retention SRAM: 48 kB
  • WiFi processor
    • IEEE 802.11b/g/n, 20MHz channel bandwidth, 2.4GHz (up to 54 Mbps)
    • IEEE 802.11s Wi-Fi mesh
    • WiFi security: WPA/WPA2-Enterprise/Personal, WPA2 SI, WPA3 SAE, and OWE
    • Operating modes: Station, SoftAP, and Wi-Fi Direct® Modes (GO, GC, GO fixed)
  • SPI flash Memory: 32 Mb (4 MB)
  • On-Chip RTC (± 250 ppm)
  • Three ultra-low power sleep modes

The module is Wi-Fi Alliance certified for IEEE802.11b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct, WPS functionalities and it has been approved by many countries including the United States (FCC), Canada (IC) and China (SRRC). Using the Wi-Fi Alliance transfer policy, the Wi-Fi Certifications can be transferred without being tested again.

JTAG

The DA16200 Thing Plus includes JTAG PTH pins for a JTAG header, to be used with debugging probe. The JTAG pins breakout the SWD (software debug) pins to the DA16200MOD module.

JTAG pins
JTAG pins on the DA16200 Thing Plus. (Click to enlarge)

RTC Switch

On the DA16200 Thing Plus, a switch is provided to control the state of the RTC_PWR_KEY pin. The RTC_PWR_KEY of the DA16200MOD is a pin that enables the RTC block; the switch essentially controls if the DA16200MOD module is in Sleep Mode 1 and acts as an external WiFi module.

RTC_PWR_KEY switch
RTC swirtch on the DA16200 Thing Plus. (Click to enlarge)
Position Notes
G Sleep Mode 1 - RTC Block Disabled
The DA16200MOD module should be controlled/operated by an external MCU.
3V The DA16200MOD module is in a normal active state. However, the module can still enter the Sleep Mode 2/3 states.

Indicator LEDs

There are three indication LEDs on the DA16200 Thing Plus for:

  • PWR: Power (Red)
  • CHG: Battery Charging (Yellow)
  • STAT: GPIO A11 (Blue)

Power LED

The red, PWR LED will light up once 3.3V is supplied to the board. For most users, it will light up when 5V is supplied through the USB connection and/or when a LiPo battery is attached to the JST connector.

Power LED
DA16200 Thing Plus PWR status LED indicator. (Click to enlarge)

Battery Charging LED

The yellow, CHG LED will light while a battery is being charged through the charging circuit. The LED will be off when no battery is present, when the charge management controller is in standby (after the battery charging has been completed), or when the charge management controller is shutdown (thermal shutdown or when the input voltage is lower than the battery voltage). The LED will be on when the charge management controller is in the process of charging the battery. For more information, please refer to the MCP73831 datasheet.

charge LED
The battery charging (CHG) LED indicator on the DA16200 Thing Plus. (Click to enlarge)
Charge Cycle State STATE
Shutdown
  • Thermal Shutdown
  • VDD < VBAT
Off (High Z)
No Battery Present* Dimmed (High Z)
Charge Complete – Standby Off (H)
Preconditioning On (L)
Constant-Current Fast Charge On (L)
Constant Voltage On (L)

Status LED

The blue, STAT LED is typically used as a test or status LED to make sure that a board is working or for basic debugging. This indicator is connected to GPIO A11.

Status LED
The status LED indicator for GPIO A11 on the DA16200 Thing Plus. (Click to enlarge)

Reset Button

The RESET button is connected to the GPIO A7 and is used to factory reset the module; press and hold the button for more than 5 seconds to initialize nvram data.

Reset Button
RESET button on the DA16200 Thing Plus. (Click to enlarge)

I2C Bus

The I2C bus for this board utilizes the GPIO connections, detailed in the table below:

Connection VDD GND SCL SDA
GPIO 3.3V GND GPIO A1 GPIO A0

I2C bus
I2C bus components on the DA16200 Thing Plus. (Click to enlarge)

Qwiic Connector

A Qwiic connector is provided for users to seamlessly integrate with SparkFun's Qwiic Ecosystem.

Qwiic Connector
Qwiic connector on the DA16200 Thing Plus. (Click to enlarge)

What is Qwiic?

The Qwiic system is intended a quick, hassle-free cabling/connector system for I2C devices. Qwiic is actually a play on words between "quick" and I2C or "iic".

Features of the Qwiic System

Keep your soldering iron at bay.

Cables plug easily between boards making quick work of setting up a new prototype. We currently offer three different lengths of Qwiic cables as well as a breadboard friendly cable to connect any Qwiic enabled board to anything else. Initially you may need to solder headers onto the shield to connect your platform to the Qwiic system but once that’s done it’s plug and go!

Qwiic Cable and Board

Qwiic cables connected to Spectral Sensor Breakout

Minimize your mistakes.

How many times have you swapped the SDA and SCL wires on your breadboard hoping the sensor will start working? The Qwiic connector is polarized so you know you’ll have it wired correctly, every time, from the start.

The PCB connector is part number SM04B-SRSS (Datasheet) or equivalent. The mating connector used on cables is part number SHR04V-S-B or equivalent. This is a common and low cost connector.

JST Connector

1mm pitch, 4-pin JST connector

Expand with ease.

It’s time to leverage the power of the I2C bus! Most Qwiic boards will have two or more connectors on them allowing multiple devices to be connected.

Jumpers

There are six jumpers on the DA16200 Thing Plus.

Users who have never worked with soldering jumpers and cutting PCB traces before (or for a quick refresher), check out our How to Work with Solder Jumpers and PCB Traces tutorial for detailed instructions and tips.

There are four adjustable solder jumpers on the mikroBUS™ carrier board labeled MEAS, BYP, 3.3V_VE and 3.3V. The table below briefly outlines their functionalities:

Jumpers
Jumpers on the DA16200 Thing Plus. (Click to enlarge)

Jumper Name/Label Description Default State
SHLD - USB-C Shield Connects the shield of the USB-C connector (metal housing) to the GND plane of the board.
Users should cut the jumper when they need to isolate the shield of the USB-C connector from the board's ground plane.
CLOSED
I2C - I2C Pull-Up Pulls the SDA/SCL lines up to 3.3V via two 2.2K Ohm resistors.
Users should cut the jumper, when there are multiple devices on the I2C bus with pull up resistors. By removing the pull up resistors from the SDA and SCL lines, the strength of the pull up resistance will be reduced.
CLOSED
MEAS - Measure Connects the USB and battery power to the voltage regulator.
Users should cut the jumper to probe the current draw into the 3.3V regulator. For help measuring current, take a look at our How to Use a Multimeter tutorial.
CLOSED
LED - LED Connects the PWR LED (red) to the 3.3V power.
Users should disconnect this jumper to reduce the current consumption of the board.
CLOSED
CHG - LED Connects the CHG LED (YLW) to the MCP73831.
Users should disconnect this jumper to reduce the current consumption of the board.
CLOSED
100/500 mA This jumper is used to select the charge rate to the LiPo battery from the MCP73831.
Users should modify this jumper to reduce the available charrge current to the LiPo battery.
500 mA
CH340 Connects the CH340 Serial-to-UART chip to 3.3V power.
Users should disconnect this jumper to reduce the current consumption of the board.
CLOSED
RST - Reset Connects GPIO A7 to the IOA7 button and the RST PTH pin.
Users should cut the jumper to disconnect the GPIO pin from the pull up resistor and isolaate the GPIO from the IOA7 button and the RST PTH pin.
CLOSED
DA MEAS - DA16200MOD Connects 3.3V to the DA16200MOD module.
Users should cut this jumper to measure the current directly to the DA16200MOD. Users can make their measurements through the jumper pads.
CLOSED

Note: When modifying these jumpers, be careful to avoid cutting nearby traces. Although not usually an issue, we thought to mention that this board is also a 4-layer PCB, so be careful not to cut the jumper too deep.

jumper traces
Traces (blue) near the jumpers on the DA16200 Thing Plus. (Click to enlarge)

Software Overview

Driver

Users will need to install the CH340 driver to allow their computer to recognize the serial-to-UART chip on the board. Most of the latest operating systems will recognize serial-to-UART chip and automatically install the required driver. However, users can also download the driver from the WCH website to manually install it on their computer. For more information, check out our How to Install CH340 Drivers Tutorial.

How to Install CH340 Drivers

August 6, 2019

How to install CH340 drivers (if you need them) on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux.

Program and Interact

Note: Users need to update the firmware on the DA16200MOD first, after installing the required driver(s).

There are several methods in which users can program and/or interact with the DA16200MOD module. To get started, users should use the serial debug interface to update the firmware on the module before anything else.

Serial Debug Interface

The DA16200 module provides a command/debug interface on UART0 for performing configuration and diagnostic functions. Users can send basic commands through the USB connection to access the basic functions on the DA16200 module. To update the firmware/bootloader on the DA16200 Thing Plus, a serial terminal application that supports Y-Modem is required.

Once installed, users will need to configure the serial terminal with the following settings for the COM port they are utilizing:

  • Baud Rate: 230400 bps
  • Data Bits: 8 (8-N-1)
  • Parity: None
  • Stop Bits: 1
  • Flow Control (HW/SW): None

For a full list of the available debug interface commands, please refer to Appendix B of the DA16200 FreeRTOS Getting Started Guide. Users can also refer to sections 4.4 - 4.6 and section 6 of the DA16200 FreeRTOS Getting Started Guide for more examples of how to utilize the serial debug interface.

Dialog DA16200 SDK

For those who are interested using the Dialog DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK, check out our getting started tutorial:

New!

Getting Started with the DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK

September 15, 2022

Interested in the DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK? This guide covers setting up the SDK in the Eclipse IDE and how to program our boards with the DA16200 module.

For more information on the DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK, please check out the following resources

AT Commands

Users can still utilize AT Commands to control the DA16200 Thing Plus; however they will need to reprogram the bootloader and firmware on the board. For more information on using AT commands check out the tutorials for our other DA16200 boards:

Dialog ULP WiFi DA16200 R3 Shield Hookup Guide

October 7, 2021

Add WiFi to your project with this hookup guide for our Dialog's Ultra Low Power DA16200 R3 shield!

MicroMod WiFi Function Board - DA16200 Hookup Guide

November 11, 2021

Add IoT functionality to any MicroMod project with the MicroMod WiFi function Board - DA16200!

For more information using the AT Commands, please check out the following resources

Demos

Here are a few webinar demonstrations from Arm, utilizing the DA16200 module with AT commands:

Source: Youtube

Hardware Assembly

Programming

The USB connection is utilized for programming, serial debug interface, and AT commands. Users only need to plug their DA16200 Thing Plus into a computer using a USB-C cable. Users will then be able to interact with the DA16200 module through a serial terminal.

SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200 connected to a computer
The SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200 connected to a computer. (Click to enlarge)

Headers

The pins for the DA16200 Thing Plus are broken out to 0.1"-spaced pins on the outer edges of the board. When selecting headers, be sure you are aware of the functionality you need. If you have never soldered before or need a quick refresher, check out our How to Solder: Through-Hole Soldering guide.

Soldering headers
Soldering headers to the DA16200 Thing Plus.

The Feather Stackable Header Kit is a great option as it allows users to stack shields (w/ Feather footprint) or it can be placed on the a breadboard; while, the pins are still accessible from the female/male headers.

JTAG Header

If users wish to connect a debugger/programmer, they will need to solder a JTAG header. (Depending on the debugger/programmer customers utilize, an adapter may be necessary.)

Soldering a JTAG header to the SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200
SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200 connected to a programmer

Connecting a programmer to the SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200. (Click to enlarge)

Battery

For remote applications, the DA16200 Thing Plus can be powered through its 2-pin JST battery connector. Additionally, users may be interested in utilizing a solar panel and USB-C cable to recharge their battery.

Battery connected to the SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200
The SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200 with a battery attached. (Click to enlarge)
Solar Panel Charger - 10W

Solar Panel Charger - 10W

PRT-16835
$18.95
1
USB 3.1 Cable A to C - 3 Foot

USB 3.1 Cable A to C - 3 Foot

CAB-14743
$5.50
4

Note: DO NOT remove batteries by pulling on their wires. Instead, it is recommended that pair of dikes (i.e. diagonal wire cutters), pliers, or tweezers be used to pull on the JST connector housing, to avoid damaging the battery wiring.

Disconnect battery w/ dikes
Using a pair of dikes to disconnect a battery. (Click to enlarge)

Qwiic Devices

The Qwiic system allows users to effortlessly prototype with a Qwiic compatible I2C device without soldering. Users can attach any Qwiic compatible sensor or board, with just a Qwiic cable.

Qwiic devices connected to SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200
The Qwiic EEPROM connected to the SparkFun Thing Plus - DA16200.

Example: Serial Debug Interface

The serial debug interface provides users with a console to access many of the basic functions of the DA16200MOD, such as provisioning the WiFi connection or uploading new firmware. Once users have connected their board to their computer, they will need to open a serial terminal can connect to the DA16200MOD module's serial debug interface. The terminal serial port should be configured for 230400 bps (8-N-1):

  • Baud Rate: 230400 bps
  • Data Bits: 8
  • Parity: None
  • Stop Bits: 1
  • Flow Control (HW/SW): None
Troubleshooting Tips:
  • If the COM port isn't available, make sure that the driver for the CH340 is installed.
  • If users don't see a splash screen or [/DA16200] # prompt, try hitting the Enter (or Return) key.
  • Otherwise, double check that the RTC switch is in the 3V position.

splash screen
Splash screen for the DA16200. (Click to enlarge)

WiFi Configuration

Follow the instructions below, to configure the WiFi connection to the DA16200 Thing Plus:

  1. From the [/DA16200] # prompt, enter setup.
  2. Users will then be prompted Stop all services for the setting. Are you sure ? [Yes/No] :.
    • Select yes, by returning y.
  3. After, country code list will be displayed and users will be prompted for their country code.
    • Users that live in the USA should enter us for their country code.
  4. Users will then be prompted to select a WiFi mode.
    • Select 1 to configure the DA16200 Thing Plus for station mode.
  5. A list of available networks will then be displayed and users will be prompted to select an option.
    • Users should enter the number of the network, which they would like to use.
  6. Users will be prompted if they want to set advanced WiFi configuration.
    • Enter n to skip this step.
  7. The WiFi connection settings will be displayed and users will be asked to confirm the configuration.
    • If the settings are correct, enter y to confirm the configuration.
  8. Users will be asked to select a connection type.
    • Enter a to select an automatic DHCP IP address.
  9. Users will be prompted to confirm the configuration.
    • Enter y to confirm the configuration.
  10. Lastly, users will be prompted about the SNTP Client and Dialog DPM (Dynamic Power Management).
    • Enter n for both of these options.

Once completed, the DA16200 will automatically reboot. After the splash screen, users should see a statement declaring that the board is in station mode (System Mode : Station Only (0)), which is eventually followed by a print out of information about the WiFi connection.

Upload New Firmware

Follow the instructions below, to upload new firmware to the DA16200 Thing Plus:

  1. From the [/DA16200] # prompt, enter reset to enter the MROM command mode.
  2. Another splash screen will be displayed followed by the [MROM] # prompt.
  3. To specify the memory location of where the new firmware is uploaded to the DA16200MOD, use the loady command.
    • For the second bootloader firmware image (FBOOT), use the loady boot or loady 0 command.
    • For the main firmware image (FRTOS):
      • Use the loady 23000 command (for slot 1).
      • Use the loady 1e2000 command (for slot 2).
  4. Upload the new firmware using Y-Modem.
    • For Windows Tera Term:
      1. From the File menu, select Transfer > YMODEM > Send.
        y-modem send
      2. Navigate to where the firmware image is stored, choose the required firmware image and start the download.
    • For Linux minicom:
      1. Press Ctrl+A+S and select ymodem from the menu.
      2. Navigate to where the firmware image is stored, choose the required firmware image and start the download.

Example: DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK

For instructions on getting started with the Dialog DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK, setting up the development environment, and building the example projects, check out our getting started tutorial:

New!

Getting Started with the DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK

September 15, 2022

Interested in the DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK? This guide covers setting up the SDK in the Eclipse IDE and how to program our boards with the DA16200 module.

STNP Sever

The Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) is as an Internet Protocol (IP) used to synchronize the clocks of networks of computers. In the DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK, there is an example project (apps > common > examples > ETC > Cur_Time) to access the Windows SNTP server and return the current time. Below are the prebuilt images for the Cur_Time example project, using version 3.2.4.0 of the SDK:

Once uploaded, if the WiFi connection has been provisioned, the board will print out the current time at regular intervals. At longer intervals, the current time will be updated from the Windows STNP server.

Build Project

To build the project, users should modify the following lines of code from the cur_time_sample.c file:

  • Line 44: TEST_SNTP_RENEW_PERIOD
    • Sets how often the board pulls the current time from SNTP server (seconds)
  • Line 45: TEST_TIME_ZONE
    • Sets the user/board's time zone (GMT)
    • Example: (-6 * 3600) represents GMT-6 or GMT (-6 hrs)
  • Line 49: CUR_TIME_LOOP_DELAY
    • Sets how often the current time is reported in the serial debug interface (seconds)

cur_time example in Eclipse
The cur_time_sample.c file and the lines to modify in the Eclipde IDE. (Click to enlarge)

Once the cur_time_sample.c file has been modified to suit the users needs, the example project can be imported and built in the Eclipse IDE. Users can then use the serial debug interface to upload the new firmware to the board. After users reboot the DA16200MOD module, the new firmware should run automatically. However, if the WiFi settings haven't been provisioned, users will need to configure the WiFi connection before the firmware starts outputting time stamps.

WiFi Configuration
The print statements from the Cur_Time example after the WiFi has been provisioned. (Click to enlarge)

OTA Firmware Update

Note: Based on our experience, we would suggest hosting the new firmware image in an AWS (Amazon web service) S3 bucket as mentioned in the OTA Update user manual. When we were testing the SDK examples, the HTTP requests would fail if firmware was hosted on our site or a GitHub repository.

The OTA (over the air) update example, allows users to update the firmware of the board by hosting the FRTOS image on a server. Through the WiFi connection, the board performs a simple HTTP request for the new firmware image. If the new image meets certain criteria, the board will download the firmware to a FRTOS slot in the SFlash memory and reboot that board to use that image.

Users can find the OTA update example project in the DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK (apps > common > examples > Network > OTA_Update). Below are the prebuilt images for the OTA_Update example project, using version 3.2.4.0 of the SDK:

Build Project

To build the project, users should modify the following lines of code from the ota_update_sample.c file:

  • Modify line 52 to enable the OTA firmware update
    • #define SAMPLE_UPDATE_DA16_FW
  • Modify line 60 with the address of the new firmware
    • static char ota_server_uri_rtos[256] = "https://sfecdn.s3.amazonaws.com/DA16200_FRTOS-GEN01-01-48589f13c-005000.img";
  • Modify line 115 to reboot with the new firmware
    • g_ota_update_conf->auto_renew = 1;

OTA example in Eclipse
The ota_update_sample.c file and the lines to modify in the Eclipde IDE. (Click to enlarge)

Once the ota_update_sample.c file has been modified to suit the users needs, the example project can be imported and built in the Eclipse IDE. Users can then use the serial debug interface to upload the new firmware to the board. After users reboot the DA16200MOD module, the new firmware should run automatically. However, if the WiFi settings haven't been provisioned, users will need to configure the WiFi connection before the new firmware can be downloaded and updated. The new firmware that is uploaded to the S3 bucket, toggles the GPIO pins, including GPIOA11 for the status LED.

Troubleshooting Tips

Note: Due to the fact that we did not develop the the DA16200 FreeRTOS SDK, there is minimal support in our forum beyond the information in the getting started guide. For more extensive support, users should refer to the documentation provided by Renesas and FreeRTOS or create a post on the appropriate forum (linked below).

We have also included some troubleshooting tips, below, for issues that users may come across.

  • One of our employees compiled a great list of troubleshooting tips based on the most common customer issues. This is the perfect place to start.
  • Users looking for support on general FreeRTOS questions, can click on this link. There users can get started with posting a topic in FreeRTOS forum.
  • Users looking for support with the DA16200 SDK specifically, should post their topic on RenesasRulz forum.

Sleep Mode Current

The DA16200 module can be put into various sleep modes to reduce the power consumption of the module. However, when measuring the current draw with the MEAS jumper, users may notice a current consumption up to 10 mA. This is largely attributed to the 7 mA operational current for the CH340 UART-to-Serial converter IC. The remaining 2-3 mA are consumed by the pull-up/down resistors and LEDs.

Serial Terminal Frozen

We have found that users could accidentally upload code, which may not function properly and potentially bog down the serial terminal; impeding it from taking inputs. If this occurs, users will need to use the J-Link programmer to program the module (with "known good" code) through the JTAG pins.

Reset

The reset button on this board doesn't cause the module to restart the firmware operation; it is used to reset the DA16200 module to the factory setting/configuration (when held down for +5 seconds). In order to reset the firmware, users can use the following commands in the serial debug interface:

  • reboot - This command will cause the module to restart the firmware execution.
  • reset/boot
    1. reset - This command will take users to the MaskROM mode.
    2. boot - From the MaskROM command mode, this command will cause the module to restart the firmware execution.

OTA Update Example

With the OTA firmware update example, users may need to erase the firmware or swap which firmware image is currently running.

Erase the Firmware

When utilizing the OTA example, users may need to erase the firmware. This can be performed through the Net command mode.

  1. From the [/DA16200] # prompt, enter net to enter the NET command mode.
  2. From the [/DA16200/NET] # prompt, enter the ota_update info command to display the firmware information from the SFLASH memory
  3. Users can then use the ota_update erase_sflash <start> <size> command to erase a section of the 4MB SFLASH memory.
    • Example: To remove the firmware operating in the RTOS #1 section (0x1e2000) with 117268 bytes of memory, users will use the command ota_update erase_sflash 0x1e2000 117268

Boot Index

There are two slots, in which the main firmware image FRTOS can be stored in the SFLASH memory. These locations are at RTOS #0 (0x23000) and RTOS #1 (0x1e2000). Through the serial debug interface, users can specify which firmware image that the board boots up with.

  1. From the command console, the boot index can be changed using the boot_idx command
    • boot_idx 0 - sets RTOS #0 as the firmware to boot
    • boot_idx 1 - sets RTOS #1 as the firmware to boot
  2. After running the boot_idx command, run the reboot command to boot the firmware that was selected.

Boot Failures

During the development process, there may be times when there is an error in the code or a problem downloading the firmware which could cause the DA16200/600 to fail to boot properly.

Please refer to Appendix D of the DA16200 FreeRTOS Getting Started Guide.