MicroMod Main Board Hookup Guide

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Contributors: bboyho, Elias The Sparkiest
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Arduino Examples

Let's go over a few basic examples to get started with the MicroMod Main Board Single and Double. We'll toggle the 3.3V voltage regulator and log data to a microSD card on both boards.

Example 1: MicroMod Main Board - Single Enable Function Board

If you have not already, select your Board (in this case the MicroMod Artemis), and associated COM port. Copy and paste the code below in your Arduino IDE. Hit the upload button and set the serial monitor to 115200 baud.

language:c
/******************************************************************************

  WRITTEN BY: Ho Yun "Bobby" Chan
  @ SparkFun Electronics
  DATE: 10/19/2021
  GITHUB REPO: https://github.com/sparkfun/SparkFun_MicroMod_Main_Board_Single
  DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT SPECIFICS:
    Firmware developed using Arduino IDE v1.8.12

  ========== DESCRIPTION==========
  This example code toggles the Function Board's AP2112 3.3V voltage 
  regulator's enable pin. The Function Boards built-in power LED should blink.
  This example is based on Arduino's built-in Blink Example:

      https://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/BuiltInExamples/Blink

  Note that this example code uses the MicroMod Main Board - Single. The MicroMod
  Main Board - Double routes the PWR_EN# pins slightly different for the
  two function boards. 

  ========== HARDWARE CONNECTIONS ==========
  MicroMod Artemis Processor Board => MicroMod Main Board - Single => Function Board

  Feel like supporting open source hardware?
  Buy a board from SparkFun!
       MicroMod Artemis Processor Board - https://www.sparkfun.com/products/16401
       MicroMod Main Board - Single - https://www.sparkfun.com/products/18575
       MicroMod Environmental Function Board - https://www.sparkfun.com/products/18632

  LICENSE: This code is released under the MIT License (http://opensource.org/licenses/MIT)

******************************************************************************/

/*Define the power enable pins for the processor board with either SDIO_DATA2 or A1.
  Depending on the processor board, the Arduino pin may be different. 

  Note: Certain Processor Boards like the Artemis have SDIO_Data2 and A1 available
        to control the Function Board's voltage regulator. SAMD51, ESP32, and STM32
        Processor Board pins do not have SDIO Data 2, so users will need to reference
        the Processor Pin A1. Below are a few examples. */


//ARTEMIS
#define PWR_EN0 4   //Function Board 0's "PWR_EN0" pin <= MicroMod SDIO_DATA2 => Artemis Processor Board (D4)
//Alternative option that does the same thing. Make sure to just choose one for PWR_EN0
//#define PWR_EN0 35   //Function Board 0's "PWR_EN0" pin <= MicroMod A1 => Artemis Processor Board (A35)

//TEENSY
//#define PWR_EN0 15   //Function Board 0's "PWR_EN0" pin <= MicroMod A1 => Teensy Processor Board (A1)

//SAMD51
//#define PWR_EN0 18   //Function Board 0's "PWR_EN0" pin <= MicroMod A1 => SAMD51 Processor Board (18)



void setup() {
  // initialize the digital pin as an output.
    pinMode(PWR_EN0, OUTPUT);
}



void loop() {
  digitalWrite(PWR_EN0, HIGH); // turn the 3.3V regulator on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(5000);                 // wait for a few seconds to do something with the function boards

  digitalWrite(PWR_EN0, LOW);  // turn the 3.3V regulator off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(5000);                 // wait for a few seconds before turning function boards back on

}

After uploading, take a look at your Function Board's PWR LED. The LED will be on for about 5 seconds and then turn off for another 5 seconds. It will continue to repeat until power is removed from the MicroMod Main Board - Single.

Example 2: MicroMod Main Board - Double Enable Function Boards

If you have not already, select your Board (in this case the MicroMod Artemis), and associated COM port. Copy and paste the code below in your Arduino IDE. Hit the upload button and set the serial monitor to 115200 baud.

language:c
/******************************************************************************

  WRITTEN BY: Ho Yun "Bobby" Chan
  @ SparkFun Electronics
  DATE: 10/19/2021
  GITHUB REPO: https://github.com/sparkfun/SparkFun_MicroMod_Main_Board_Double
  DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT SPECIFICS:
    Firmware developed using Arduino IDE v1.8.12

  ========== DESCRIPTION==========
  This example code toggles the Function Board's AP2112 3.3V voltage
  regulator's enable pin. The Function Boards built-in power LED should blink.
   This example is based on Arduino's built-in Blink Example:

      https://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/BuiltInExamples/Blink

  Note that this example code uses the MicroMod Main Board - Double. The MicroMod
  Main Board - Single routes the PWR_EN0 pin slightly different for the
  function board. 

  ========== HARDWARE CONNECTIONS ==========
  MicroMod Artemis Processor Board => MicroMod Main Board - Double => Function Boards

  Feel like supporting open source hardware?
  Buy a board from SparkFun!
       MicroMod Artemis Processor Board - https://www.sparkfun.com/products/16401
       MicroMod Main Board - Double - https://www.sparkfun.com/products/18576
       MicroMod Environmental Function Board - https://www.sparkfun.com/products/18632

  LICENSE: This code is released under the MIT License (http://opensource.org/licenses/MIT)

******************************************************************************/

/*Define the power enable pins for the processor board with SDIO_DATA2.
  Depending on the processor board, the Arduino pin may be different. 

  Note: Certain Processor Boards like the Artemis have more than one pin available 
        to control the Function Board's voltage regulator (e.g. SDIO_DATA2 and G5).
        SAMD51, ESP32, and STM32 Processor Board pins do not have SDIO Data 2, so
        users will need to reference the Processor Pin G5. Below are a few examples. */

//ARTEMIS
#define PWR_EN0 4    //Function Board 0's "PWR_EN0" pin <= MicroMod SDIO_DATA2 => Artemis Processor Board (D4)  
#define PWR_EN1 26   //Function Board 1's "PWR_EN1" pin <= MicroMod SDIO_DATA1 => Artemis Processor Board (D26)

//Alternative option that does the same thing. Make sure to just choose one for PWR_EN0 and PWR_EN1
//#define PWR_EN0 29   //Function Board 0's "PWR_EN0" pin <= MicroMod G5 => Artemis Processor Board (A29)
//#define PWR_EN1 14   //Function Board 1's "PWR_EN0" pin <= MicroMod G6 => Artemis Processor Board (D14)


//TEENSY
//#define PWR_EN0 39   //Function Board 0's "PWR_EN0" pin <= MicroMod SDIO_DATA2 => Teensy Processor Board (D39)
//#define PWR_EN1 34   //Function Board 1's "PWR_EN1" pin <= MicroMod SDIO_DATA1 => Teensy Processor Board (D34)

//Alternative option that does the same thing. Make sure to just choose one for PWR_EN0 and PWR_EN1
//#define PWR_EN0 45   //Function Board 0's "PWR_EN0" pin <= MicroMod G5 => Teensy Processor Board (45)
//#define PWR_EN1 6   //Function Board 1's "PWR_EN1" pin <= MicroMod G6 => Teensy Processor Board (6)

//Note: The SAMD51, ESP32, and STM32 Processor Board Pins do not have SDIO Data 2 and SDIO Data 1.

//SAMD51
//#define PWR_EN0 7   //Function Board 0's "PWR_EN0" pin <= MicroMod G5 => SAMD51 Processor Board (D7)
//#define PWR_EN1 8   //Function Board 1's"PWR_EN1" pin <= MicroMod G6 => SAMD51 Processor Board (D8)

//ESP32
//#define PWR_EN0  32   //Function Board 0's "PWR_EN0" pin <= MicroMod G5 => ESP32 Processor Board (32)
//#define PWR_EN1  33   //Function Board 1's"PWR_EN1" pin <= MicroMod G6 => ESP32 Processor Board (33)



void setup() {
  // initialize the digital pins as an output.
  pinMode(PWR_EN0, OUTPUT); 
  pinMode(PWR_EN1, OUTPUT);

}



void loop() {

  digitalWrite(PWR_EN0, HIGH); // turn the 3.3V regulator on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  digitalWrite(PWR_EN1, HIGH); // turn the 3.3V regulator on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(5000);                 // wait for a few seconds to do something with the function boards 

  digitalWrite(PWR_EN0, LOW);  // turn the 3.3V regulator off by making the voltage LOW
  digitalWrite(PWR_EN1, LOW);  // turn the 3.3V regulator off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(5000);                 // wait for a few seconds before turning function boards back on

}

After uploading, take a look at the PWR LEDs on the Function Boards. The LEDs will be on for about 5 seconds and then turn off for another 5 seconds. It will continue to repeat until power is removed from the MicroMod Main Board - Double.

Example 3: Reading and Writing to a MicroSD Card

The example below uses the built-in SD Arduino library. The only difference in the code is the CS pin for the microSD card, which you will need to adjust for your processor board (in this case we use the Artemis Processor Board). Make sure to reference your Processor Board's CS pin for either the Main Board - Single (D1) or Main Board - Double (G4).

If you have not already, select your Board (in this case the MicroMod Artemis), and associated COM port. Copy and paste the code below in your Arduino IDE. Hit the upload button and set the serial monitor to 9600 baud.

language:c
/*
  SD Card Read/Write

  This example shows how to read and write data to and from an SD card file
  The circuit:

  SD card attached to SPI bus as follows:

   SD Card  - MicroMod Artemis Processor Board
   -----------------------------------
   COPI/SDO - pin 38
   CIPO/SDI - pin 43
   CLK      - pin 42
   CS       - pin 1 (Main Board - Single) or 28 (Main Board - Double)

  created   Nov 2010
  by David A. Mellis
  modified 9 Apr 2012
  by Tom Igoe

  This example code is in the public domain.

*/

#include <SPI.h>
#include <SD.h>

//ARTEMIS
//const int SD_CS_PIN = 1; // The microSD Card CS pin is D1 for the MicroMod Main Board - Single and Artemis Processor (D1). Adjust for your processor if necessary.
const int SD_CS_PIN = 28; // The microSD Card's CS pin is G4 for the MicroMod Main Board - Double and Artemis Processor (D28). Adjust for your processor if necessary.

File myFile;

void setup() {
  // Open serial communications and wait for port to open:
  Serial.begin(9600);
  while (!Serial) {
    ; // wait for serial port to connect. Needed for native USB port only
  }


  Serial.print("Initializing SD card...");

  if (!SD.begin(SD_CS_PIN)) {
    Serial.println("initialization failed!");
    while (1);
  }
  Serial.println("initialization done.");

  // open the file. note that only one file can be open at a time,
  // so you have to close this one before opening another.
  myFile = SD.open("test.txt", FILE_WRITE);

  // if the file opened okay, write to it:
  if (myFile) {
    Serial.print("Writing to test.txt...");
    myFile.println("testing 1, 2, 3.");
    // close the file:
    myFile.close();
    Serial.println("done.");
  } else {
    // if the file didn't open, print an error:
    Serial.println("error opening test.txt");
  }

  // re-open the file for reading:
  myFile = SD.open("test.txt");
  if (myFile) {
    Serial.println("test.txt:");

    // read from the file until there's nothing else in it:
    while (myFile.available()) {
      Serial.write(myFile.read());
    }
    // close the file:
    myFile.close();
  } else {
    // if the file didn't open, print an error:
    Serial.println("error opening test.txt");
  }
}

void loop() {
  // nothing happens after setup
}

If all goes well, you should see the following output if this is the first time writing to the card!

language:bash
Initializing SD card...initialization done.
Writing to test.txt...done.
test.txt:
testing 1, 2, 3.

If you are looking to go the extra mile to see if data was saved, close the Serial Monitor and remove power from the MicroMod Main Board. Eject your microSD card from the socket and insert into a microSD card adapter. Then insert the microSD card into your computer's card reader or USB port. Open the test.txt file in a text editor. You should see an output similar to what you saw in the Serial Monitor after the file was opened as shown below.

language:bash
testing 1, 2, 3.

Besides verifying the data in the file, this step is also useful if you adjust the code to continuously log data in a CSV format. After logging data, you could the open text document in a spreadsheet and graph the values!

More Examples!

Sweet! Now that we know that we can read and write to the microSD card, try exploring the other examples in either the SD or SdFat Arduino libraries. Or check out the following MicroMod tutorials that have a built-in microSD card socket for ideas on data logging. Better yet, try adding a sensor and write some code to log some data!

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